Home
Videos uploaded by user “ChangingSeasTV”
ORA Behind The Scenes
 
02:20
Go behind the scenes with Adam Heinrich, Production Manager of ORA, as he explains the life cycle of Clownfish in captivity.
Views: 4548 ChangingSeasTV
Alien Invaders - Full Episode
 
26:51
In the waters of the western Atlantic and Caribbean, a voracious alien predator has taken hold. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the invasive lionfish is a major threat to biodiversity and the health of already stressed coral reef ecosystems. The popular aquarium fish is thought to have first been released into the wild in South Florida in the mid 1980s. With no natural predator in this part of the world, lionfish numbers have increased rapidly. To combat this problem, experts are encouraging people to "eat'em to beat'em". Changing Seas joins scientists in the field to learn more about this beautiful, yet gluttonous feeder and the threat it is posing to native fish populations.
Views: 41343 ChangingSeasTV
Life in Red Bays, Andros Island, Bahamas
 
03:50
While shooting an episode on sponges, the Changing Seas team was given a tour of North Andros by local sponger Fritzgerald Taylor. Sponging is a tradition on the island, with three different commercially viable species collected on the Great Bahama Bank. The sponges are cleaned and dried before being sold to a wholesaler that ships them to markets all over the world.
Views: 3938 ChangingSeasTV
"Seagrasses & Mangroves" Pt. 1
 
12:53
They are an ancient species of flowering plants that grow submerged in all of the world's oceans. Seagrasses link offshore coral reefs with coastal mangrove forests. Today, these "prairies of the sea," along with mangroves, are on the decline globally. Scientists fear the diminishing vegetation could result in an ecosystem collapse from the bottom of the food chain all the way to the top. Changing Seas joins experts in the field as they work to restore Florida's important mangroves and seagrasses. Known as "hotspots of biodiversity," seagrasses and mangroves attract and support a variety of marine life. However, worldwide damage and removal of these plants continue at a rapid pace. Changing Seas travels along Florida's coastline to get a better understanding of the significant roles mangroves and seagrass play within the state. Can biologists prevent a negative ripple-effect throughout the marine food web before it's too late? How will rising sea levels impact these plants as well at the communities that depend on them?
Views: 10001 ChangingSeasTV
Various Types of Crinoids
 
05:39
Dr. Chuck Messing from Nova Southeastern University's Oceanographic Center describes the various types of crinoids. To watch Dr. Messing plunge into the depths of the sea looking for some of these living fossils aboard a deep sea sub, watch "Changing Seas" episode "Living Fossils" now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sphfDHfrQI&list=UU2L3PrUh7nWFA_Fva8RoGcA
Views: 4617 ChangingSeasTV
Toxic Algae: Complex Sources and Solutions - Full Episode
 
27:14
Lake Okeechobee was once the blue heart of Florida, pumping fresh water down to the Everglades and beyond. But now that a dike and canal system control its flow, water releases from the lake periodically create putrid mats of blue green algae. Scientists think water pollution is to blame, and if something isn’t done about it there could be irreparable damage to the environment, the local economy and people’s health.
Views: 44844 ChangingSeasTV
Seagrasses and Mangroves - Full Episode
 
26:48
They are an ancient species of flowering plants that grow submerged in all of the world’s oceans. Seagrasses link offshore coral reefs with coastal mangrove forests. Today, these “prairies of the sea,” along with mangroves, are on the decline globally. Scientists fear the diminishing vegetation could result in an ecosystem collapse from the bottom of the food chain all the way to the top. Changing Seas joins experts in the field as they work to restore Florida’s important mangroves and seagrasses. Known as “hotspots of biodiversity,” seagrasses and mangroves attract and support a variety of marine life. However, worldwide damage and removal of these plants continue at a rapid pace. Changing Seas travels along Florida’s coastline to get a better understanding of the significant roles mangroves and seagrasses play within the state. Can biologists prevent a negative ripple-effect throughout the marine food web before it’s too late? How will rising sea levels impact these plants as well at the communities that depend on them? Learn more at www.changingseas.tv or facebook.com/changingseas
Views: 20036 ChangingSeasTV
Hagfish Dissection
 
07:02
On an expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, Dr. Dean Grubbs from Florida State University, dissects a deep sea hagfish. To watch his team from FSU's Coastal Marine Lab in action, check out the "Changing Seas" episode "Creatures of the Deep" now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEIqgFUxV2g&list=UU2L3PrUh7nWFA_Fva8RoGcA
Views: 117008 ChangingSeasTV
Tour the R/V Weatherbird II
 
04:55
The R/V Weatherbird II is the flagship of the Florida Institute of Oceanography's fleet, based at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg campus. The vessel is equipped with "advanced laboratories, oceanographic devices and sensor technology designed to enable scientists and students to study and learn about various aspects of the ocean's biological, chemical, geological and physical characteristics." For more information, check out: http://fio.usf.edu/Vessels/RVWeatherbird.aspx
Views: 5969 ChangingSeasTV
Majestic Mantas  - Full Episode
 
27:14
The remote Revillagigedo Archipelago off Mexico’s Pacific coast is a hotspot for giant mantas that interact with awe-struck scuba divers. Scientists with the Pacific Manta Research Group are studying the local population using photo ID techniques and acoustic tags which track the movements of these mysterious fish. Experts from Pelagios Kakunjá are conducting experiments to see if the filter-feeding rays are impacted negatively by microplastics, tiny pieces of toxic trash that float in the ocean. Learn more at: http://www.changingseas.tv/episode904.html
Views: 7403 ChangingSeasTV
"Farming the Sea"  Pt. 1
 
13:40
Changing Seas travels from coast to coast, meeting with experts who raise fish for food production and to replenish depleted wild populations. Learn how scientists are making it possible to grow marine fish miles away from shore, and discover which Florida research facilities are testing new methods for making aquaculture more environmentally sustainable and efficient. Also visit Cedar Key, Florida, where aquaculture has helped to preserve the area's rich fishing heritage. Here, former gillnet fishermen turned clam-farmers harvest their product with little impact to the local ecosystems.
Views: 222425 ChangingSeasTV
"Seagrasses & Mangroves" Pt. 2
 
13:52
They are an ancient species of flowering plants that grow submerged in all of the world's oceans. Seagrasses link offshore coral reefs with coastal mangrove forests. Today, these "prairies of the sea," along with mangroves, are on the decline globally. Scientists fear the diminishing vegetation could result in an ecosystem collapse from the bottom of the food chain all the way to the top. Changing Seas joins experts in the field as they work to restore Florida's important mangroves and seagrasses. Known as "hotspots of biodiversity," seagrasses and mangroves attract and support a variety of marine life. However, worldwide damage and removal of these plants continue at a rapid pace. Changing Seas travels along Florida's coastline to get a better understanding of the significant roles mangroves and seagrass play within the state. Can biologists prevent a negative ripple-effect throughout the marine food web before it's too late? How will rising sea levels impact these plants as well at the communities that depend on them?
Views: 3800 ChangingSeasTV
Reef Revival - Full Episode
 
26:44
In the emerging science of coral reef restoration, marine biologists and resource managers are discovering naturally occurring mechanisms that promote coral growth and restore ecological balance in these gardens of the sea. Since the late 1970s close to 98% of Staghorn and Elkhorn corals have disappeared from reefs in Florida and the Caribbean. Around the world, damage from boat groundings and other factors have placed these organisms on the "threatened" list of the Endangered Species Act. Staghorn and Elkhorn are considered principal reef building corals. In South Florida, scientists are using native sponges and spiny sea urchins in novel ways that may help attract corals to damaged sites. Can nature heal itself with a little help from marine experts? Can new technologies help restore the lost coral communities?
Views: 13740 ChangingSeasTV
Super Grouper - Full Episode
 
26:55
Florida’s underwater giants are back! After years of over-harvesting, Goliath Grouper have made a noticeable resurgence off of Florida’s coasts. Changing Seas joins scientists in the field as they study the life history of these awe-inspiring fish. Their goal is to gain a better understanding of the species and the obstacles it faces on the road to full recovery. Weighing up to a thousand pounds and reaching seven feet in length, Goliath Grouper, Epinephelus itajara, are the Atlantic Ocean’s largest species of fish in the sea bass family. Formerly known as Jewfish, years of over-harvesting severely reduced the Goliath’s numbers, and in 1990 the fishery was closed in U.S. waters. Since then, the species has had time to slowly regenerate in Florida and the fish are once again seen on popular dive sites, especially in the summertime when the animals aggregate to spawn. But this recovery hasn’t been a welcome sight to all – some recreational fishermen believe goliath grouper are devouring popular game fish, and that it is time to re-open the fishery. Scientists, however, have conducted studies on the grouper’s diet and determined that their main source of food is crustaceans – and not other groupers and snappers. Researchers say it’s too early to re-open the fishery. While they are encouraged by the goliath’s recovery in Florida, the fish remain critically endangered throughout the rest of their range. Learn more at www.changingseas.tv or facebook.com/changingseas
Views: 6220 ChangingSeasTV
The Future of Seafood - Full Episode
 
27:18
It is estimated there will be two billion more people on the planet by mid-century. To feed this booming world population, more fish will need to be farmed than ever before. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable way is to move aquaculture operations offshore – where there is plenty of available space and strong currents flush out the pens to avoid polluting sensitive ecosystems. Learn more at http://changingseas.tv/episode901.html.
Views: 18183 ChangingSeasTV
Farming the Sea - Full Episode
 
26:45
An ever-growing demand for fresh seafood has pushed wild fish stocks around the world to the brink. In Florida, scientists and other experts are farming the sea in an attempt to alleviate some of these fishing pressures. “Aquaculture,” or “fish farming,” is the cultivation of marine or freshwater organisms. Some aquaculture methods have been highly criticized for their negative environmental impacts, but other, more environmentally friendly techniques, are being perfected at various research institutions in Florida. Changing Seas travels from coast to coast, meeting with experts who raise fish for food production and to replenish depleted wild populations. Learn how scientists are making it possible to grow marine fish miles away from shore, and discover which Florida research facilities are testing new methods for making aquaculture more environmentally sustainable and efficient. Also visit Cedar Key, Florida, where aquaculture has helped to preserve the area’s rich fishing heritage. Here, former gillnet fishermen turned clam-farmers harvest their product with little impact to the local ecosystems. Learn more at www.changingseas.tv or facebook.com/changingseas
Views: 97396 ChangingSeasTV
Maug’s Caldera: A Natural Laboratory - Trailer
 
04:49
In the remote Pacific, the islands of Maug rise out of the sea. Here shallow hydrothermal vents are found close to coral reefs. These vents emit levels of CO2 that can be expected in the world’s oceans by the end of the century, making these waters a natural laboratory for scientists studying the impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. a co-production with Open Boat Films
Views: 1310 ChangingSeasTV
Filleting a Lionfish
 
03:44
Lad Akins from REEF demonstrates how to safely fillet a lionfish. Check out the video to find out how to turn lionfish spines into skewers or toothpicks. For more information on Lionfish, please visit www.reef.org.
Views: 2690210 ChangingSeasTV
Grand Cayman’s Stingray City/Sandbar
 
02:24
Grand Cayman’s Stingray City/Sandbar is a popular site where guests can safely interact with wild stingrays in a shallow, tropical setting.
Views: 19518 ChangingSeasTV
"Prescription: Oceans" Pt. 2
 
16:06
The oceans are part of America's newest medical frontier. In Florida, scientists are studying a variety of marine invertebrates which may hold the key to unlocking the secrets of our own biology. At Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Fort Pierce, researchers are testing sea sponges for their potential anti-cancer properties. At The Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience in Marineland, experts are taking a closer look at horseshoe crabs to better understand how eyes function and change with age. Scientists there are also studying sea slugs for insights into neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. What clues will these and other simple organisms reveal about the human body? Are there cures that lie beneath the waves?
Views: 4341 ChangingSeasTV
Tour of the Island School and Cape Eleuthera Institute
 
09:39
Check out this short tour of the Island School and Cape Eleuthera Institute. According to its website, "The Island School is a mind, body, and spirit journey that takes students away from traditional high school curriculum and invites them to confront authentic challenges. Classes are designed to allow first-hand engagement with the people and environment of The Bahamas. English, math, environmental art, history, applied scientific research, human ecology, and marine ecology are offered; each course focuses on the application of knowledge to real-world problems. SCUBA diving, island exploration, and two kayaking expeditions complement daily morning exercise and campus work that encourages each student to develop leadership and teamwork skills." The Changing Seas crew worked with experts from the institute while shooting their "Alien Invaders" episode in Eleuthera, Bahamas.
Views: 8517 ChangingSeasTV
Horseshoe Crabs
 
04:45
Learn more about this ancient animal.
Views: 10311 ChangingSeasTV
Conchs with Dr. Megan Davis
 
02:23
Changing Seas web-extra from Season 1's "Farming the Sea." Dr. Megan Davis from Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute at Florida Atlantic University briefly explains the biology and life history of the Milk conch and the Queen conch. Dr. Megan Davis is the Center Director for Habor Branch's Aquaculture Development Park at Florida Atlantic University.
Views: 5809 ChangingSeasTV
Sea Turtles: The Lost Years - Full Episode
 
26:44
After sea turtle hatchlings emerge from their nests, they vanish into the sea. Until recently, their journey was largely shrouded in mystery. Now, as technology advances, researchers from the University of Central Florida are beginning to understand where turtles go during their so-called “lost years.” This episode won in the Marine Science category at the BLUE Ocean Film Festival in 2016 in St. Petersburg, FL.
Views: 7796 ChangingSeasTV
Dolphins: Breaking the Code - Full Episode
 
26:43
Dr. Denise Herzing has dedicated her career to studying a community of wild Atlantic spotted dolphins that live in the shallow, crystal clear waters of the Bahamas. Through non-invasive, in-water observation, she researches the animals’ social structure, behaviors and communication. Now modern technology is making it possible to correlate the dolphins’ sounds and behavior, bringing Herzing and her collaborators closer to decoding dolphin communication. Learn more at https://www.changingseas.tv/season-10/dolphins-breaking-the-code/
Views: 838 ChangingSeasTV
"Prescription: Oceans" Pt. 1
 
10:38
The oceans are part of America's newest medical frontier. In Florida, scientists are studying a variety of marine invertebrates which may hold the key to unlocking the secrets of our own biology. At Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Fort Pierce, researchers are testing sea sponges for their potential anti-cancer properties. At The Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience in Marineland, experts are taking a closer look at horseshoe crabs to better understand how eyes function and change with age. Scientists there are also studying sea slugs for insights into neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. What clues will these and other simple organisms reveal about the human body? Are there cures that lie beneath the waves?
Views: 7711 ChangingSeasTV
"Farming the Sea" Pt. 2
 
13:02
Changing Seas travels from coast to coast, meeting with experts who raise fish for food production and to replenish depleted wild populations. Learn how scientists are making it possible to grow marine fish miles away from shore, and discover which Florida research facilities are testing new methods for making aquaculture more environmentally sustainable and efficient. Also visit Cedar Key, Florida, where aquaculture has helped to preserve the area's rich fishing heritage. Here, former gillnet fishermen turned clam-farmers harvest their product with little impact to the local ecosystems.
Views: 50850 ChangingSeasTV
Dr. Guy Harvey at his Grand Cayman Art Gallery
 
05:47
Famous marine wildlife artist and scientist Dr. Guy Harvey talks about his research and what inspires his artwork at his gallery on Grand Cayman, BWI.
Views: 3682 ChangingSeasTV
Sunken Stories - Full Episode
 
26:46
In the Florida Keys, divers from around the country learn how to map shipwrecks and apply their skills on a mysterious 19th-century slave ship. When diving isn't possible, professional explorers use high-tech tools to scan objects buried beneath the seafloor.
Views: 1625 ChangingSeasTV
Under Pressure - The Effects of Depth on Styrofoam
 
01:04
Have you ever wondered about the force of pressure in the deep sea? Here scientists are having some fun while conducting otherwise serious research at sea. To learn more about this research cruise in the Gulf of Mexico, check out the "Changing Seas" episode "Creatures of the Deep" by clicking this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEIqgFUxV2g&list=UU2L3PrUh7nWFA_Fva8RoGcA
Views: 20410 ChangingSeasTV
Beneath The Bridge - Full Episode
 
26:43
The Blue Heron Bridge in Riviera Beach, Florida, is known as one of the best shore dives in the United States. What appears as an unlikely dive site at first is home to a rich variety of marine life, ranging from sea horses to manta rays. A scientist from Florida Atlantic University is studying the two species of octopus that live here, to better understand how these animals can co-exist in one area without competing with each other. In addition, a group of dedicated underwater photographers is contributing to scientific knowledge by documenting the large number of nudibranchs, or sea slugs, that live beneath the bridge.
Views: 4610 ChangingSeasTV
"Reef Revival" Web Extra # 2
 
02:32
Dive in and join Ken Nedimyer on an exciting tour of his coral reef nursery in Key Largo. Nedimyer, and his Coral Restoration Foundation, are working on a new and exciting technique to grow out staghorn coral cuttings on hanging lines before they are transplanted on a reef restoration site.
Views: 1056 ChangingSeasTV
Living Fossils - Full Episode
 
26:48
In the deep, dark waters off the coast of Roatan, Honduras, strange flowerlike animals flourish. These sea lilies and feather stars, known as Crinoids, have been around in various forms since before the age of Dinosaurs. Now experts descend into the deep to study the animals from a submersible.
Views: 9001 ChangingSeasTV
Goliath Grouper Aggregation
 
01:39
Each summer, large numbers of goliath groupers aggregate off the coast of Jupiter, Florida, to spawn. To learn more about goliath groupers, take a look at "Super Groupers" on the "Changing Seas TV" YouTube channel.
Views: 3592 ChangingSeasTV
Fish Identification
 
02:19
To properly identify rarely seen species of deep sea fish, scientists consult the literature and examine animals closely. To learn more about the work of FSU's Coastal and Marine Lab in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico, check out the "Changing Seas" episode "Creatures of the Deep" now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEIqgFUxV2g&list=UU2L3PrUh7nWFA_Fva8RoGcA
Views: 1117 ChangingSeasTV
Sponges
 
03:25
In the tropical waters off the coasts of Florida, the Bahamas and Caribbean, shallow water sponges are common sights on reefs. These filter feeders, which are animals, come in all shapes, sizes and colors. Scientists are studying the important ecological roles sponges play in the ecosystem.
Views: 2524 ChangingSeasTV
Manatees: Conserving a Marine Mammal - Full Episode
 
26:43
Every winter, hundred of manatees aggregate at Crystal River, Florida, attracted by the warmer, clear waters. This sanctuary is also a treasure for scientists, who take advantage of these manatee gatherings to study them. From decades of visual ID studies to the most cutting-edge DNA research, experts hope that science will help conserve this beloved marine animal.
Views: 11271 ChangingSeasTV
Dolphins: Breaking the Code - Trailer
 
03:05
Dr. Denise Herzing has dedicated her career to studying a community of free-ranging Atlantic spotted dolphins that live in the shallow, crystal clear waters of the Bahamas. Through non-invasive, in-water observation, she researches the animals’ social structure, behaviors and communication. Now modern technology is making it possible to correlate the dolphins’ sounds and behavior, bringing Herzing and her collaborators closer to decoding dolphin communication.
Views: 629 ChangingSeasTV
Sponges: Oldest Creatures in the Sea? - Full Episode
 
26:44
Until recently there was a scientific consensus that sponges were the first animals to branch off the "Animal Tree of Life," a kind of family tree for all living and extinct animals on earth. But recent DNA research has cast doubt on that theory, with some scientists suggesting that ctenophores, also known as comb jellies, are an older lineage.
Views: 34788 ChangingSeasTV
Sponges: Oldest Creatures in the Sea? - Trailer
 
03:08
Until recently there was scientific consensus that sponges were the first animals to branch off the “Animal Tree of Life,” a kind of family tree for all living and extinct animals on earth. But recent DNA research has cast doubt on that theory, with some scientists suggesting that ctenophores, also known as comb jellies, are an older lineage.
Views: 5155 ChangingSeasTV
Saving Sawfish - Trailer
 
02:18
"Saving Sawfish" - The strange, prehistoric-looking Smalltooth Sawfish were once coveted by anglers as popular trophy fish. But habitat loss and over-fishing have greatly reduced the animals' range and landed them on the endangered species list. Today, the fish are limited to South Florida, where scientists are conducting research to save the species.
Views: 1229 ChangingSeasTV
Billfish: Battle on the Line? - Full Episode
 
26:44
DescriptionThe unique oceanographic conditions of the eastern tropical Pacific make the area one of the best spots in the world for big game anglers to hook billfish. But intense pressures from commercial fishing operations have taken their toll on the numbers of sailfish and marlin in the region. Researchers are studying the animals to provide the data necessary to protect the fish populations from further decline.
Views: 4372 ChangingSeasTV
Soldier Key Wreck
 
03:26
In this web-extra clip from "Sunken Stories," experts at Biscayne National Park conduct an archaeological survey on a site they call the "Soldier Key Wreck." Little is known about this wreck, but researchers still managed to find tiny clues that could reveal important information about the ship's past.
Views: 2022 ChangingSeasTV
Coral Hybrids - Full Episode
 
26:43
While Elkhorn and Staghorn corals have undergone a drastic decline in the Caribbean, their hybrid, "Fused Staghorn," is increasing in numbers in parts of the region. One scientist is studying the animals in Belize to see if the hybrid might be better equipped to deal with environmental stressors than its parents.
Views: 2990 ChangingSeasTV
Galapagos: Windows into the Future - Trailer
 
03:10
Galápagos: Windows into the Future a co-production with Changing Seas and the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation The unique oceanic conditions of the Galápagos Islands serve as a perfect natural laboratory to study how climate change may impact corals in the future. Scientists spend a month in the archipelago to conduct research as part of the Global Reef Expedition.
Views: 484 ChangingSeasTV
Saving Sawfish - Full Episode
 
26:54
The strange, prehistoric-looking Smalltooth Sawfish were once coveted by anglers as popular trophy fish. But habitat loss and overfishing have greatly reduced the animals' range and landed them on the endangered species list. Today, the fish are limited to South Florida, where scientists are conducting research to save the species.
Views: 10657 ChangingSeasTV
Maug’s Caldera: A Natural Laboratory -  Full Episode
 
26:44
In the remote Pacific, the islands of Maug rise out of the sea. Here shallow hydrothermal vents are found close to coral reefs. These vents emit levels of CO2 that can be expected in the world’s oceans by the end of the century, making these waters a natural laboratory for scientists studying the impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. a co-production with Open Boat Films
Views: 1778 ChangingSeasTV
Aquanaut Technology
 
08:07
What does it take to work for several hours underwater? Aquanauts at Florida's Aquarius Undersea Laboratory in Key Largo use special equipment that allows for saturation diving 60 feet below the ocean's surface. Mark Hulsbeck, Operations Manager for NOAA's Aquarius shorebase headquarters explains the the tools and equipment used by aquanauts.
Views: 1608 ChangingSeasTV
The Future of Seafood - Trailer
 
03:54
It is estimated there will be two billion more people on the planet by mid-century. To feed this booming world population, more fish will need to be farmed than ever before. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable way is to move aquaculture operations offshore – where there is plenty of available space and strong currents flush out the pens to avoid polluting sensitive ecosystems. Learn more at www.changingseas.tv and www.facebook.com/changingseas.
Views: 822 ChangingSeasTV
Mahi-mahi Research at the University of Miami Experimental Hatchery
 
02:31
Experts at the University of Miami Experimental Hatchery raise mahi-mahi, also known as dorado or dolphin, to better understand the impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill on the species. They also want to know if the fish are good candidates for future aquaculture operations. Postdoctoral Researcher John Stieglitz, Ph.D. provides an inside look at the research.
Views: 717 ChangingSeasTV

Voveran 50 ge composition of air
Levitra 20mg obat untuk ejakulasi dini terapi
Noroxin 400 mg dosierung paracetamol
Nanda racing nrx 10daydetox
Frontline spray 100ml dosage for benadryl