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Search results “Ecology of sea animals” for the 2011
Shore ecology
 
23:59
Video about ecology of the shoreline.
Views: 9274 Whirlytunes
15.1.3 What are the reproductive strategies
 
03:04
http://braingenie.com
Views: 4399 braingenie
Marine Biome Video (Intertidal Zone, Reefs, Open Ocean, Deep Sea) SCIENCE  EXPERIMENT
 
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!!!Oceanography Experiment!!! (Marine Biome Video and Oceanorgaphy Video) SCIENCE EXPERIMENT Crazy Chris is diving into the ocean and shows you how to model an ocean ecosystem right at home! Objective: To understand the different ecosystems in the ocean environment. Materials Needed: ~ Pan ~ Rocks ~ Shells ~ Seaweed ~ Sand Step 1) Head down to the beach and collect beach rocks, shells, seaweeds and beach sand. Step 2) Pour the sand into the pan and then angle the sand so it goes up from the bottom of one side to the top of the other side. Step 3) Add rocks in the shallow end of the pan, scatter the sea shells all over the pan, add some torn up seaweed and finish it off by pouring water in until it reaches about 3/4 the way to the top. Step 4) Add a fan to make waves like those you would see in the ocean and at the beach. HOW DOES IT WORK: You may think of the ocean as a gitan ecosytem but in actually a giant enviroment housing some of the worlds largest ecosystems. There are 4 major types of ocean ecosystems. Inter-tidal zones, tide polos and shore lines are areas that are continually being drenched in ocean water as the tides comes in and out. This area can be under water daily to infrequent. The animals that live here are usually scavangers, eating what ever the sea has washed ashore such as dead animals or algeas. The ecosystem you modeled in the pan is an interidal ecosystem. Continental coast or areas that are sumerged completely in water year round. Such as kelp forrests which areas with a high dencity of kelp or anchord kelp beds as well as reefs the most diverse ecosystem in the world. Reefs are made up of a coral and other calcium deposting organisms which anchor to hard surfaces such as rocks or other reefs. Reefs support an abundant community of living things such as fish and other organisusm including the coral themselves. Deep Sea is an areas of the ocean and the floor which receives no natural light from the sun. These areas usually consist of trenches or hydrothermal vents that spring up near oceanic ridges. These areas are the most hostile of the ocean ecosystems due to thier lack of light, extream pressures as well as the highest levels of salt build up. It may seem impossible to support life here, how ever these areas support unique animals such as the anglerfish wich uses bio-luminescence to attract other fish, giant tube worms which spring up near hydro thermal vents, the vampire squid as well as an numerous microbial organisums which get thier energy from the thermal vents. and finally the open ocean which consists of just ocean water from the surface down to about 4,000 meters. This area pretty much relies on plankton for food and consists of a fish which live in water columes, areas that are not near the ocean floor or dont live in the other ocean ecosystems, seajellies as well as a few drifting plants such as seaweed. !!!Oceanography Experiment!!! (Marine Biome Video and Oceanography Video) SCIENCE EXPERIMENT "ocean ecosystem" "ocean ecology" " "oceanography" "oceanography video" "oceanography lecture" "oceanography documentary" "oceanography waves" "oceanography song" "oceanography 2010" "oceanography class" "oceanography music" "oceanography experiment" "oceanography experiments" "marine biome video" "marine biology" "marine biologist" "marine biologist seinfeld" "marine biology videos" "marine biologist at work" "marine biology 7th edition" "marine biology career" "marine biorb" "marine biologist career" "marine biology documentary" !!!Oceanography Experiment!!! (Marine Biome Video and Oceanography Video) SCIENCE EXPERIMENT "science experiments" "cool science experiments" "science fair prodjects" "science fair prodject ideas" "science experiments gone wrong" "science tricks" "science experiments for school" "science experiments explosions" "science experiments cool" "science experiments at home" "science experiments easy" !!!Oceanography Experiment!!! (Marine Biome Video and Oceanography Video) SCIENCE EXPERIMENT
Views: 10487 SoCoolScienceShow
Galápagos Rift 2011: New Hydrothermal Vent Discovered
 
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On the ninth remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of the Galapágos Rift 2011 expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, the science team finally discovered the type of hydrothermal vent community they had been searching for. Clusters of tube worms, limpets, mussels, and anemones were seen to inhabit cracks in the lava bed where mineral-rich, geothermally heated water 'vents' out. Two species of tube worms were found in abundance: the giant Riftia pachyptila and also the much smaller, never observed in the Galápagos, Tevnia jerichonana. Brachyuran crabs, vent shrimp, and scale worms clung not only to the surrounding rock but also to the tube worms themselves in some cases. Extensive fields of dead and living clams surrounded the individual pockets of venting. Video courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Galapágos Rift Expedition 2011. Source: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1103/welcome.html
Views: 97132 oceanexplorergov
Dr. Tunnicliffe Deep Ocean Part 1
 
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Verena Tunnicliffe, Director of VENUS Subsea Observatory and Professor, University of Victoria As the Director of VENUS, Verena Tunnicliffe ensures that scientists and citizens can get a peek at the underwater world. Her research focuses on the ecology and evolution of hot-vent animals and marine community history. View part 2: http://youtu.be/6cdyVLGXQIE
Views: 87 VanaquaSciLectures
Salish Sea Life on the Rocks
 
04:00
Here's a sampler of mainly invertebrate marine life typically found in the Salish Sea. The Salish Sea is the body of water ranging from Puget Sound (near Seattle) north and east of Vancouver Island. Shots in this video were taken in Hood Canal, Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, San Juan Islands, Howe Sound, Saanich Inlet and Browning Pass.
Views: 1726 Michael Meagher
Ecology of the Red Sea and Arabian gulf
 
03:43
from the The desert seas documentary: "The Arabian gulf seemed to be the ugly duckling of the two seas. Now it seems the gulf perform the final miracle and restock the reef. The parade of riches in the Red Sea relies almost on nothing. The harshness of the Arabian gulf has become its true wealth." هل تعلم ؟! ان الكائنات البحريه و المرجان في البحر الأحمر يتغذى ويعتمد اعتماد شبه كلي على عوالق و افرازات الزائده من المرجان و العوالق في الخليج العربي. شاهد المقطع للمزيد عن هذه المعلومه علماً بأن هذه العمليه البيئيه الرائعه سبحان الله مصوره اول مره.
Views: 634 wrefai
Weddell Seal Ecology in Antarctica
 
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Every springtime in Antarctica Weddell seals return to Erebus Bay to give birth and raise their new pups. And every year a team of researchers and graduate students based at Montana State University returns to Antarctica to study the ecology of these iconic apex predators in this nearly pristine marine environment. Video features interviews with ecologists Robert Garrott and Jay Rotella, professors in the Ecology Department at MSU, and MSU graduate student Jen Mannas. Video production by Mary Lynn Price. More information at http://WeddellSealScience.com .
Views: 5527 WeddellSealScience
Plastic Planet
 
06:27
Earth day: Plastic is everywhere, it's forever, and it is choking up our planet & the animals who live here. Our everyday shopping habits can have a huge impact on the pollution of our environment & so let's read labels & buy carefully so we can make positive steps towards a healthier planet. As well as products that use plastic packaging there are many products made from plastics that look like natural materials. -- Say hello or buy Natracare (totally plastic free) pads, tampons, liners and wipes: http://www.natracare.com/blog/cotton-... https://www.facebook.com/Natracare/ https://twitter.com/natracare Thanks for watching!
Views: 1427606 Natracare
Part 1 - 'Do Marine Protected Areas work?' Professor Hugh Possingham
 
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Do Marine Protected Areas work, a presentation to the South Australian Parliament held on 5th April 2011. Part 1 introduces the basic scientific principles behind the Marine reserve systems. To view - Part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mcRt71XQtI To view - Part 3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Euf5Pi8rU5Y Professor Hugh Possingham is an Australian Professorial Fellow in Integrative Biology. He received his PhD from the University of Oxford in 1987. His research projects are in the field of decision theory in conservation biology: · Reserve design, biodiversity management and fire regime management · Population viability analysis (PVA) - including the development of ALEX · Pollination ecology · Metapopulation dynamics · Ecological economics · Stochastic modelling · Biodiversity and climate change · Population dynamics of marine organisms · Marine reserve design · Marine population dynamics · Avian community ecology · Edge effects and fragmentation · Landscape ecology · Behavioural and population ecology of parasitoids Expanded biography Professor Hugh Possingham completed Applied Mathematics Honours at The University of Adelaide in 1984. After attaining a Rhodes Scholarship Hugh completed his D.Phil at Oxford University in 1987. Postdoctoral research periods followed at Stanford University and ANU (as an ARC QEII Fellow). In 1991 he took a Lectureship, later Senior Lectureship, in Applied Mathematics at The University of Adelaide. In 1995 he was appointed Foundation Chair of the Department of Environmental Science at The University of Adelaide. In July 2000 Hugh took up a joint Professorship between Ecology and Mathematics at The University of Queensland. He was elected to The Australian Academy of Science in 2005 and now sits on their council. Professor Possingham is currently an ARC Federation fellow (2007 -- 2011) and Director of a Commonwealth Environment Research Facility www.aeda.edu.au. The Possingham lab includes nine postdoctoral researchers and twenty-five PhD students working on empirical and theoretical aspects of the applied population ecology of plants and animals. Particular areas of recent research include marine reserve design, optimal landscape reconstruction for birds, metapopulation dynamics of plants and animals, population viability analysis, kangaroo and koala management, and optimal weed control (as part of the Weeds CRC). The lab has a unifying interest in environmental applications of decision theory. Hugh has published over 100 refereed articles and book chapters. Hugh has a variety of broader public roles including past Chair of the federal government Biological Diversity Advisory Committee, member of the NHT Advisory Committee, member of the state Ministerial Advisory Committee on Vegetation Management, member of the Research and Conservation Committee of Birds Australia and member of the Board of Greening Australia, Queensland. The lab has a unifying interest in environmental applications of decision theory. Its reserve design software, Marxan (Eureka Prize 2009) is now used in over 100 countries to build their marine reserve system designs. Hugh has co-authored over 220 Web of Science papers which have received over 5500 citations. He sits on 16 boards and committees external to the University including: Member of the Queensland Smart State Council, Birds Australia Atlas Advisory Committee, Wildcountry Council, FASTS and The Myer Foundation Sustainability and Environment Committee. Professor Hugh Possingham's research interests are in pure and applied population ecology: efficient reserve design and habitat reconstruction; optimal management of populations for conservation, pest control and harvesting; survey methods for detecting bird decline; and metapopulation dynamics of mound springs snails.
Learn Biology: Community Ecology- Interspecific Interactions
 
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Learn Pilates (but save $$$): http://mhlo.co/learnpilates Mahalo biology expert Mary Poffenroth discusses the three types of interspecific interaction.  Interspecific interaction is a biological concept within community ecology, or the study of the organization and functioning of the populations of species living within a particular habitat. As a part of the web of communities, interspecific interaction refers to when two unrelated species have certain types of interactions.http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities# Examples of interactions can include pollination, nesting and feeding.http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NRqEYroujqA Three types of interspecific interactions include mutualism, commensalism and parasitism. These interactions can benefit both species, neither benefit nor harm either species or benefit only one of the species while harming the other. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NRqEYroujqA The organization and stability of biological communities result from the mix of these types of interactions.http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities#  Mutualism --------------------------------------------------------------------- Mutualism occurs when two unrelated species (species A and B) both benefit from a specific interaction (+,+). Often in mutualistic interactions, one species acts as the host while the other is the "visitor." One example involves bees and flowers - bees benefit from pollination because they need the flower's nectar to survive, while flowers benefit from pollination because it allows them to reproduce.http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NRqEYroujqA The benefits that are received from these interactions can vary from one species to another. A species can gain food, protection from enemies, a nesting site or a combination of benefits. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities# Commensalism --------------------------------------------------------------------- Commensalism occurs when species A benefits from the interaction, but species B remains neutral (+,0). Species B, then, does not benefit from nor is harmed by the interaction. In commensal interactions, species A may depend on species B for food, shelter, support, transport or a combination of all of these.http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities#  An example of commensalism is with anemone fish ( clownfish) and sea anemone. Anemone fish, whose scales are immune to the anemone's lethal sting, can seek protection from enemies within the tentacles of the anemone.http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/fish/clown-anemonefish/ The anemone, however, does not really benefit from this interaction.http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NRqEYroujqA Parasitism --------------------------------------------------------------------- Parasitism is an interspecific interaction where species A benefits, but species B is harmed. In this case, the parasite lives and feeds on its host, thus decreasing the host's ability to survive, but not killing it. Parasites likely make up half of all living species and parasitic interaction is the way that these species survive.http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities# Examples of common parasites include lice, bed bugs and fleas, which attach to species such as humans and other mammals to feed on their blood. Though not fatal, these parasites easily spread from one host to another and can cause itching and other discomforts.http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/headlice.html Read more by visiting our page at: http://www.mahalo.com/community-ecology-interspecific-interactions/
Views: 4186 MahaloBiology
Lake Ecology & Role of Aquatic Plants
 
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DNR Water Resources Management Specialist Jay Schiefelbein discusses water quality, water clarity, and the role of aquatic plants in Lake Winnebago. March 31, 2011
Studying deepwater animals with TrapCam
 
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Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.2041-210X.2011.00128.x/abstract Brett Favaro, Simon Fraser University and Vancouver Island University, demonstrates the construction of TrapCam apparatus: an inexpensive camera system developed for the study of deepwater animals and ecology.
Views: 572 MethodsEcolEvol
Ecology the Aquatic environment 1
 
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In this video I talk about the aquatic environment and why it's important.
Views: 379 FortuneFavorsPrep
My Sea Pansy Suspension-Feeding!
 
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A sea pansy that I found on Tybee Island next to Savannah GA. I thought it was dead when I picked it up for my ecology project (I've gotten alot of my tank animals from the beach anyway because I'm a poor high school student and they're free. Especially hermit crabs for my peacock mantis shrimp) but when I saw it squirming around I put it in my 55 gallon saltwater tank! I had no idea what these were untill I found it and so far none of the biology teachers I've asked had either. Its scientific name is Renilla reniformis. If I turn out all the lights in the room for about thirty minutes and then start poking it, it gives off these really bright ripples of light! I tried to get it on camera but my camera doesn't do too well in the dark. It's also really squirmy and I often find it in different parts of the tank every morning. ^-^ Int the video its stalk (peduncle) is on the side but it has since burrowed it into the ground. There is very little information on how to take care of these online so I will list what's kept it alive for at least the past 2 weeks. -I target feed it phytoplankton daily and then let some extra plankton loose in the tank. From what I've read it does photosynthesize but it gets most of its nutrition from suspension-feeding. I've also read that it has to eat alot, making it hard to keep. -Specific gravity: a little less than 1.024 -Nitrates: less than 10 ppm -I have a 2.5 inch deep sandbed with a bottom layer of live sand and a layer of crushed coral on top. There's a good bit of zooplankton swimming around in the crushed coral. -As you can see I have a lot of bubbles in my tank (My gut teels me that it needs a good bit of oxygen) -Temp 76-80 Degrees F I plan to be a marine invertebrate zoologist so I'm really happy I found this.
Views: 5481 Sone781
Biodiversity
 
07:35
055 - Biodiversity Paul Andersen explains the importance of biodiversity. He starts by describing how biodiversity can be species, genetic or ecosystem diversity. He explains the importance of keystone species in an environment and gives two examples; the jaguar and the sea otter. He finishes with a quote from the father of biodiversity, E.O. Wilson. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Capybara, n.d. http://a-z-animals.com/animals/capybara/pictures/3371/. "File:Caiman Yacare.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Caiman_yacare.jpg. "File:Collared peccary02 - Melbourne Zoo.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Collared_peccary02_-_melbourne_zoo.jpg. "File:Defensive Turtle.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Defensive_turtle.jpg. "File:E. O. Wilson Sitting, October 16, 2007.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:E._O._Wilson_sitting,_October_16,_2007.jpg. "File:Hopetoun Falls.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Hopetoun_falls.jpg&oldid=588434541. "File:Junior-Jaguar-Belize-Zoo.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Junior-Jaguar-Belize-Zoo.jpg. "File:Litoria Tyleri.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Litoria_tyleri.jpg. "File:Mazama Gouazoubira (AU)-Right 01.JPG." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mazama_gouazoubira_(AU)-right_01.JPG. "File:MC Drei-Finger-Faultier.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, March 24, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:MC_Drei-Finger-Faultier.jpg&oldid=555337656. "File:Nine-Banded Armadillo.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nine-banded_Armadillo.jpg. "File:Plos Wilson.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Plos_wilson.jpg. "File:Sea Otter Cropped.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, March 24, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Sea_otter_cropped.jpg&oldid=345476170. File:Seaurchin 300.jpg, n.d. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seaurchin_300.jpg. "File:Tapirus Terrestris.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tapirus_terrestris.jpg. "File:Tractors in Potato Field.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 9, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tractors_in_Potato_Field.jpg. Maruch, Stef. The Kelp Forest Exhibit at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, August 24, 2007. kelp-forest.jpg. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kelp-forest-Monterey.jpg. Pittman, Robert. From Source: Two Mammal-Eating "Transient" Killer Whales Photographed off the South Side of Unimak Island, Eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska., December 5, 2006. NOAA (http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/Quarterly/amj2005/divrptsNMML3.htm]). http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Killerwhales_jumping.jpg. PlikLEunects Notaeus (Puntaverde Zoo, Italy).jpg, n.d. http://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/Plik:Eunectes_notaeus_(Puntaverde_Zoo,_Italy).jpg. "Species Discovered and Species to Discover." Accessed April 9, 2014. http://www.wrsc.org/attach_image/species-discovered-and-species-discover. Ziegler, Photos courtesy of Christian. Conservation Efforts Hinge on Understanding the Factors Controlling Biodiversity. The Diverse Forest Canopy on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Has Provided Ecologist Stephen Hubbell with Years of Data to Test His Controversial Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography. Despite the Different Fruit Types and Dispersal Modes Pictured Here, Hubbell Wonders How Well Patterns of Diversity Can Be Explained by Focusing on the Similarity of Species rather than Their Differences., August 15, 2006. Beyond Neutrality—Ecology Finds Its Niche. Gewin V, PLoS Biology Vol. 4/8/2006, e278 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0040278. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Forest_fruits_from_Barro_Colorado.png.
Views: 166987 Bozeman Science
Talk to the scientist:  Marine ecology
 
02:05
This film (1) was created as a teacher resource for a KS3 and KS4 Biology lesson called "What animals live on the seafloor?" This film is the introduction to the lesson. Bryony Pearce, Marine ecologist at Marine Ecological Surveys (MES) talks about her role in the scientific research into the ecology of the Humber, off the east coast of the United Kingdom. In 2008, the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) commissioned Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) research into four main dredging regions in the United Kingdom -- the Thames, South Coast, East Coast and Humber. These studies involved experts from universities, survey companies and heritage organisations investigating the archaeology, geology and ecology of the seafloor. The aim of the studies was to ensure that we use the sea sustainably, without damaging its natural or physical heritage. This film was produced by Wessex Archaeology as part of the Explore the Seafloor project, funded by MALSF to promote the results of the RECs.
Views: 260 ExploretheSeafloor
MLML Open House Vertebrate Ecology Lab
 
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Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) in an internationally renown marine science institution located in the heart of the Monterey Bay. The documentary focuses on the Open House, an annual event where the public of all ages are invited to come and see state of the art research of the scientists, staff, and students. Events include a puppet show, a sea lion show, seminars, lectures, experiments, interactive games, a touch tank, fish painting and guided walks. The purpose of the Open House is to garner public support of MLML programs, enlighten the next generation, and raise awareness of marine pollution and environmental issues.
Views: 263 iamasalmon
Learn Biology: Community Ecology- Interspecific Interactions
 
02:33
Check out Bas Rutten's Liver Shot on MMA Surge: http://bit.ly/MMASurgeEp1 Mahalo biology expert Mary Poffenroth discusses the three types of interspecific interaction.  Interspecific interaction is a biological concept within community ecology, or the study of the organization and functioning of the populations of species living within a particular habitat. As a part of the web of communities, interspecific interaction refers to when two unrelated species have certain types of interactions.http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities# Examples of interactions can include pollination, nesting and feeding.http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NRqEYroujqA Three types of interspecific interactions include mutualism, commensalism and parasitism. These interactions can benefit both species, neither benefit nor harm either species or benefit only one of the species while harming the other. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NRqEYroujqA The organization and stability of biological communities result from the mix of these types of interactions.http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities#  Mutualism --------------------------------------------------------------------- Mutualism occurs when two unrelated species (species A and B) both benefit from a specific interaction (+,+). Often in mutualistic interactions, one species acts as the host while the other is the "visitor." One example involves bees and flowers - bees benefit from pollination because they need the flower's nectar to survive, while flowers benefit from pollination because it allows them to reproduce.http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NRqEYroujqA The benefits that are received from these interactions can vary from one species to another. A species can gain food, protection from enemies, a nesting site or a combination of benefits. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities# Commensalism --------------------------------------------------------------------- Commensalism occurs when species A benefits from the interaction, but species B remains neutral (+,0). Species B, then, does not benefit from nor is harmed by the interaction. In commensal interactions, species A may depend on species B for food, shelter, support, transport or a combination of all of these.http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities#  An example of commensalism is with anemone fish ( clownfish) and sea anemone. Anemone fish, whose scales are immune to the anemone's lethal sting, can seek protection from enemies within the tentacles of the anemone.http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/fish/clown-anemonefish/ The anemone, however, does not really benefit from this interaction.http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NRqEYroujqA Parasitism --------------------------------------------------------------------- Parasitism is an interspecific interaction where species A benefits, but species B is harmed. In this case, the parasite lives and feeds on its host, thus decreasing the host's ability to survive, but not killing it. Parasites likely make up half of all living species and parasitic interaction is the way that these species survive.http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/129392/community-ecology/70602/Interspecific-interactions-and-the-organization-of-communities# Examples of common parasites include lice, bed bugs and fleas, which attach to species such as humans and other mammals to feed on their blood. Though not fatal, these parasites easily spread from one host to another and can cause itching and other discomforts.http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/headlice.html Read more by visiting our page at: http://www.mahalo.com/community-ecology-interspecific-interactions/
Views: 27632 mahalodotcom
Save Sea Turtles- Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)
 
02:57
Buy the song on iTunes: http://bit.ly/tI0Jyl I love sea turtles. Please join me in making changes to help ensure their survival. This song is off my brand new EP, which can be purchased on iTunes or at: http://LindseyYung.com All the underwater footage from this video was shot by me in Maui. PLEASE SHARE THIS VIDEO AND SPREAD THE WORD. Thanks for watching and listening. Official Website: http://www.LindseyYung.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/LindseyYung Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LindseyYung
Views: 2766 Lindsey Yung Tuthill
Little Fishy Things Demo Video
 
02:05
"Shaq's Little Fishy Things" is a bright and shiny ecology trip for kids through the world's most amazing ocean habitats where they meet and learn about some fascinating sea creatures through stunning underwater videos and graphics. Shaquille "Shaq" O'Neal, ecology advocate, famous basketball legend, and a hero to millions of families and their kids, hosts the trip through this undersea wonderland. On the journey, kids will meet Myrtle the Sea Turtle, Lenny the Blenny, Lilly the Lobster, Ernesto The Moray Eel and other amusing ocean inhabitants whose videos will spark investigations on the "Little Fishy Things" website, accessed through the APP. On the web-link, parents will find more videos, hands-on projects and fun follow-up to the APP experience to share with their children. In the APP, each of the dozen sea creatures has an associated video, a "Professor Fish" info module and pictures. The website allows kids and parents to drill down deeper into ocean ecology with activities and fun links. There are two hidden games in the APP (think "what would a worm do in his spare time" for a clue as to where to find the games). Don't bother to keep score, just touch the sea creature, move your finger and watch the action once you discover where the game is! "Shaq's Little Fishy Things" is the first in a series of similar APPs which, in an engaging and exciting way, help raise awareness of the magnificent seas that surround us all and the amazing creatures that live there in this "inner space and last frontier" on Earth.
Views: 124 LittleFishyThings
ScienceMan Digital Lesson - Biology - Intertidal Zone
 
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ScienceMan.com provides free digital lessons and technology integration help for teachers and students. In this digital lesson, ScienceMan discusses how the intertidal zone is unique and how intertidal organisms are specially adapted to survive in such a challenging environment. ScienceMan™ and ScienceMan Digital Lessons are protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Views: 5678 ScienceMandotcom
California Central Coast Kelp Forest Promo
 
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California Central Coast Kelp Forest DVD of our Ocean Creatures by Carol Georgi Have you ever wondered what lives under the kelp floating in our nearshore waters? The California Central Coast kelp forest is one of the most diverse places in the world and one of the least explored. Terry Lilley and Sue Sloan explore the undersea world of the kelp forests off California's Central Coast, filming a world of surprising beauty, color and diversity. Diving over 1000 times from kayaks, Lilley (marine biologist and former pro-surfer) and his assistant Sloan introduce us to the rich marine life of the kelp ecosystem. Watching this film, we easily see why these ecosystems, rarely found in Southern California, need to be protected by a national marine sanctuary. You can order a Kelp Forest DVD from SLO Surfrider Foundation, PO Box 13222, San Luis Obispo, CA. Please include a check made out to SLO Surfrider for $20, shipping is included. Watch a sample of the video to enjoy a mind-expanding view or our underwater world along the California Central Coast. Come with Terry Lilley and Sue Sloan as they descend into the world of the kelp forest off SLO County's central coast. Video and Narration by Biologist Terry Lilley and Assistant Sue Sloan This DVD shows many ocean creatures, including: giant lingcod, huge schools of rockfish, rare angle sharks, colorful sea slugs and anemones in every color of the rainbow, 300 pound seals, giant crabs and lobsters. Most of the Ocean Creature photos used in these articles are from this DVD. Jeff Pienack, Chair, Surfrider SLO
Views: 3421 underwater2web
South Africa field work for the BSc (Hons) Marine Biology and Coastal Ecology course
 
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BSc (Hons) Marine Biology and Coastal Ecology field work in South Africa
Views: 458 SciEngPlymUni
Ecosystems Song
 
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Here is a song I created to help my 6th grade students study. I hope you enjoy. Ecosystem Ecology how the living Interacts with their home Where they meet Eat and greet other species in biomes And the place where an organism lives, habitat Provides the things an organism needs Organisms of one species Population- species grouping More populations- communities Birds that flock, bugs and rocks, temperature and soil They make up ecosystems Eco-systems have a flow Sunlight, water, oxygen, temperature, soil Yeah so, Abiotic not life, no Biotic grows like plants, fungi, animals When the zone shuts down Food is low, ow, ow, ow, Space is down It's a crowd, owd, owd, owd Weather- hurricanes and snow That's how limiting factors make them leave their homes Adaptations change animals over and over Alter bodies physical, behavioral, behavioral Eating, finding homes Niche- a kind of role No matter day or night competition Species die off From the ocean to the land Animals killing and eating them Is it a predator, or is a prey? They will catch, kill their prey, it's what predation's for They gon' tear their food up Eco-systems have a flow Sunlight, water, oxygen, temperature, soil Yeah so, Abiotic not life, no Biotic grows like plants, fungi, animals When the zone shuts down Food is low, ow, ow, ow, Space is down It's a crowd, owd, owd, owd Weather- hurricanes and snow That's how limiting factors make them leave their homes A close relationship between two species and one benefits I'll tell you that there are three types of symbiosis Mutualism is the one that benefits each species When one isn't helped nor harmed, it's commensalism When a parasite harms a host, host, host, host Parasitism, live inside, or outside, on it Eco-systems have a flow Sunlight, water, oxygen, temperature, soil Yeah so, Abiotic not life, no Biotic grows like plants, fungi, animals When the zone shuts down Food is low, ow, ow, ow, Space is down It's a crowd, owd, owd, owd Weather- hurricanes and snow That's how limiting factors make them leave their homes
Views: 771212 ParrMr
Underwater Life In The Galapagos: Marine Life & Galapagos Islands Fish
 
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Watch the underwater life in the Galapagos, including species of fish, sharks & other Galapagos marine life during a diving cruise with Quasar! Learn more at - https://www.quasarex.com/galapagos/marine-life
Views: 5049 Quasar Expeditions
Animals of Marine Rocky Shore, Spring 2011, Humboldt
 
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We took these clips and pics of marine animals while snorkeling the high subtidal and low intertidal in the spring of 2011 at Palmers Point in Patrick's Point State Park, Humboldt County, California. My sci-fi comedy novel USED ALIENS: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BJ602QQ
A look at some sea creatures - Qatar Marine Festival 2011
 
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Our friendly guide gave us a look at some of the unique sea creatures you can find in our region as well as some local variety as well! http://www.iloveqatar.net
Talk to the Scientist : Biotopes
 
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This film (4) was created as a teacher resource for a KS3 and KS4 Biology lesson called "What animals live on the seafloor?" Bryony Pearce, Marine ecologist at Marine Ecological Surveys (MES) explains how ecologists create biotope maps of the seafloor during scientific research into the ecology of the Humber, off the east coast of the United Kingdom. In 2008, the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) commissioned Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) research into four main dredging regions in the United Kingdom -- the Thames, South Coast, East Coast and Humber. These studies involved experts from universities, survey companies and heritage organisations investigating the archaeology, geology and ecology of the seafloor. The aim of the studies was to ensure that we use the sea sustainably, without damaging its natural or physical heritage. This film was produced by Wessex Archaeology as part of the Explore the Seafloor project, funded by MALSF to promote the results of the RECs.
Views: 91 ExploretheSeafloor
Wildlife Conservation
 
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Students who are interested in the life sciences, whole organisms, ecology, and the biological aspects of the environment can find their interests met in the Wildlife Conservation major. Students in this program learn about wildlife management; conservation techniques; and non-domesticated animals, including insects and vertebrates. The curriculum builds from basic courses in biology, chemistry, and conservation to more specialized and supporting courses such as ecology, botany, and mammalogy. You also will take general education courses in computers, English, mathematics, social sciences, humanities, literature and the arts to ensure breadth in your undergraduate experience and to provide skills and knowledge necessary to the practice of conservation. For more information about Wildlife Conservation at the University of Delaware, check out: http://www.udel.edu/admissions/majorfinder/ Edited by: Laura Schultz '13
Keystone Predator Lab Demo
 
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This laboratory recreates the famous experiments of Paine and colleagues in the Pacific Northwest with the sea star Pisaster (and 8 other marine intertidal species). Students do transplant experiments to figure out competitive relationships and sample gut contents to construct a food web. Next they use their data to predict what will happen when each predator is removed from the system. Finally, they do the removal experiments and compare their results with their predictions. This is a great introductory lab in that it explores basic ecological concepts and although it is not difficult, it asks students to think critically, synthesizing experimental data to make predictions. It also provides a nice foundation for discussions of the important roles that different species can play in a community.
Views: 2433 SimbioticSoftware
SAVE OUR PLANET - Loss of top animal predators has massive ecological effects
 
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SAVE OUR PLANET... In a paper published in the July 15, 2011 issue of the journal Science, an international team of 24 researchers conclude that the precipitous decline of predators such as wolves, leopards and plankton-consuming whales is having a cascading effect that in turn is causing significant imbalance throughout land, freshwater and marine ecosystems.
Views: 184 NoteworthyNews
Eerie Vocals of Weddell Seal Pup & Adult
 
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A video of Weddell seals making some of their eerie, other-worldly sounds. Weddell seals vocalize both underwater and when they are on top of the sea ice. This video shows two male Weddell seals vocalizing, and a Weddell seal pup practicing! More information at http://WeddellSealScience.com .
Views: 91166 WeddellSealScience
Semporna Marine Ecological Expedition 2010
 
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Semporna Marine Ecological Expedition (SMEE) 2010 - a three-week scientific expedition to document the biodiversity richness and coral reef health of the Semporna Priority Conservation Area (PCA), Malaysia. It was jointly organized by WWF-Malaysia, Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS), Universiti Malaya (UM) and the Netherlands Centre for Biodiversity (NCB) Naturalis, together with partners from the Malaysian Government, Univeriti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Univerisiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS) and Old Dominion University (USA) from 29 November to 19 December 2010. The expedition aimed to give a full account of the total species numbers of corals, fish and other taxa plus a snapshot of the reef condition throughout the Semporna PCA.
Views: 6141 WWFMy
Species Extinction Ad - Science Ecology Project
 
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This is a species extinction ad for my science ecology project, it a quick ad for an environmental problem. Hope you have fun watching
Views: 145 Mark Patricio
Horse Conch Eats Lightning Whelk: from "In the Grass, On the Reef"
 
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http://wfsu.org/blog-coastal-health/ In the Grass, On the Reef: Testing the Ecology of Fear WFSU-TV Wednesday, July 3 at 10:00 AM/ ET If you don't live in our viewing area (N. FL, S. GA), the program will be uploaded to the "In the Grass, On the Reef" web site: http://wfsu.org/blog-coastal-health/ The horse conch is the largest predatory snail in Florida Waters. They're practically ecosystems onto themselves, often covered in barnacles, crepidula snails, bryozoans, and other small marine animals that affix themselves to hard surfaces (including the occasional oyster). They have these massive bright orange bodies inside their shells. In this video, you'll see horse conchs roaming seagrass beds in the Florida Gulf, specifically St. Joseph Bay and Bay Mouth Bar. This is an excerpt from the new "In the Grass, On the Reef" documentary, "Testing the Ecology of Fear." The program follows Dr. David Kimbro and Dr. Randall Hughes as they study predator/ prey interactions in salt marshes, oyster reefs, and on the seagrass beds and sand flats of Bay Mouth Bar. Bay Mouth Bar contains the largest diversity of predatory snails in the world, and an overwhelming variety of clams, crabs, worms, sand dollars, sea stars and others. But the horse conch is the lion of this habitat. As the largest predator, the horse conch affects the ecosystem by eating other predatory snails, who in turn eat clams. The clams eat phytoplankton in the water, filtering it clean, so by controlling clam predators, the horse conch benefits the clams and the water. But are its effects over other snails like banded tulips and lightning whelks purely consumptive, or might fear control them as well? The fear of being eaten might change the behavior of these intermediate predators, affecting more individuals that a horse conch can eat. Through their research, Dr. Hughes and Dr. Kimbro hope to find out how predators might scare smaller animals in economically and and ecologically ecosystems.
Views: 11392 WFSU Public Media
Vegan Captain Paul Watson (Sea Shepherd): Animal Intelligence and Our Human Extinction
 
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As stated by Captain Watson at minute 4:10 "We have removed about 90% of the fishes from the Ocean!" "One of the problems with people is that we associate intelligence with technology... We don't understand non-manipulative intelligence." -Captain Paul Watson, Sea Shepherd "We must stop eating the oceans. Eating fish is, for all intents and purposes, an ecological crime." -Captain Paul Watson, Sea Shepherd "We need to consider the needs of the fishes and we need to give them the space and the time to recover from the terrible slaughter we have inflicted upon all the species that live in the sea... If an ecological collapse occurs because of the removal of a pivotal species or species, we won't be worrying about jobs. We'll be worrying that our fellow man will be hunting and eating us." -Captain Paul Watson, Sea Shepherd "For 31 years, Captain Paul Watson has been at the helm of the world's most active marine non-profit organization - Sea Shepherd Conservation Society." -http://www.seashepherd.org/who-we-are/captain-paul-watson.html To watch the full interview visit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iacsoGJSxis&feature=uploademail ____________________________________________________________ ECO TRUTH: We have NOW reached critical environmental tipping points of no return, and there are many more to come within this next decade if we do not wake-up and become the change! Think this time-line is extreme? At the beginning of our industrial age, Rainforests covered 14% of our planet's land surface; in 2004 the estimate was less than 6%, declining at a rate of 30-50+ million acres per year! The Atlantic forest of Brazil has now been reduced to 5% ~ "...remnant patches in a sea of agricultural fields." http://www.rainforestconservation.org/rainforest-primer/4-case-studies-in-tropical-deforestation/a-the-neotropics/2-brazil Meat And Dairy (MAD) Consumption: Since the 1970's, 90% of Rainforest deforestation and 70% of ALL deforestation has been, and still is, from MAD consumption! At our current rate of MADness the Indonesian Rainforest will be gone within 10-15 years! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=As8XAMTrXXg Our Oceans Are Dying: 90% of Big Fish Are GONE ~ What Are WE Doing? We have only one ocean and it is in SERIOUS trouble! We ARE the solution: As Plant-Based Diet Consumers, we can turn this around NOW! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObNSqa14QNU Climate Change: "We are all toast if we don't get on another path." -James Hansen, Director of the NASA Goddard Institute of Space Sciences. It is projected (NASA satellite images) that most of the Arctic sea ice will be gone by summer 2012. This ice reflects (DID reflect) 80% of the suns heat to keep our planet Earth's currents (temperatures) in balance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7cYGDdXQjg Ⓥ Mother Nature is telling us that we will be Vegan (human animal's natural diet) or we will no longer be: Environmental devastation, and epidemic levels of physical, and obviously mental disease (DisEase)! At this point of our evolution, humans are anatomically and physiologically Herbivore/Frugivore (Plant-Based Diet); no matter what we have been told/SOLD to believe: http://veganzeitgeist.wordpress.com/2012/02/10/our-beliefs-meat-and-dairy-mad-consumers-the-facts-plant-based-diet http://twitter.com/VeganZeitgeist https://www.facebook.com/VeganZeitgeist http://VeganZeitgeist.wordpress.com http://www.linkedin.com/in/VeganZeitgeist If we want Peace in our World, why would we create and consume violence!? Thank you for being or becoming Vegan so ALL may LIVE! Vegan Zeitgeist claims no rights to this video or its contents - for educational and enlightenment purposes only. This video was created by: http://suprememastertv.com For information on how you can save our Planet and ALL Life by embracing a Vegan Life visit: http://www.crisis2peace.org
Views: 3444 VeganZeitgeist
In the Grass, On the Reef: Testing the Ecology of Fear
 
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http://wfsu.org/blog-coastal-health/ Dr. David Kimbro and Dr. Randall Hughes are researchers at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory. They work in coastal ecosystems like salt marshes, oyster reefs, seagrass beds, and sand flats where many commercially important species reside. This program looks at work they are doing with predator prey relationships. How do predators affect important foundation species like oysters and marsh cordgrass. When top predators eat the smaller animals that consume oysters and grasses, they help these ecosystem builders flourish. But it might be that fear of top predators makes intermediate consumers change their behavior, and affect the foundation species more profoundly than mere consumption. This documentary is part of the In the Grass, On the Reef multimedia project. The IGOR web site features a blog that tracks Randall and David's studies, and where coastal life is celebrated through food, art, and music. Through photos and videos, you can learn about how coastal ecosystems function, and what impact they have on human life.
Views: 1630 WFSU Public Media
Endangered Seahorses - Oceans - BBC
 
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Want more natural history and wildlife videos? Visit the official BBC Earth channel: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthWW BBC Earth The BBC Earth YouTube channel is home to over 50 years-worth of the best animal videos from the BBC archive. With three new videos released every week there’s something for all nature loves from astounding animal behaviour to beautiful imagery. Click here to find our more: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthWW Philippe Cousteau and the team come face-to-face with one of the Indian Ocean's most mysterious creatures, the Seahorse. As the team race against time to identify one of the ocean's most cryptic animals, they make a remarkable discovery. Visit http://www.bbcearth.com for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos and watch more high quality videos on the BBC Earth YouTube channel
Views: 44878 BBC Studios
Road Ecology YouTube
 
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"Roads in the landscape context affect everything-not just animals, but they affect hydrology, they affect soils, chemicals that come off the roads from road salts, hydrocarbons, vegetation and invasive plants-it's an all encompassing ecological affect." Dr. Tony Clevenger
Views: 1551 highwaywilding
CARTA:Altruism-Social Evolution in Microbes, Animals, Humans
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv) Steve Frank is Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Irvine. One of his current research projects is centered on microbial life history and sociality. The theory of virulence is an example of the broader problems of sociality and life history. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Show ID: 21284]
Shark extinction and its effect on ocean ecosystem - Gordon Ramsay
 
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Gordon Ramsay talks to a marine biologist about the effect that the popularity of shark fin soup is having on shark numbers. He learns about finning of sharks. In Gordon Ramsay's Shark Bait, the world's most famous chef will expose the shocking practices that are threatening the existence of one of the earth's most amazing creatures and confront the illicit fishermen, traders and diners who are responsible for the shark's precipitous decline.
Views: 16611 Gordon Ramsay
Burma's Environment and Pollution
 
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Just this past Februrary, water that was contaminated with pneumonia was spread into the river, killing fish and other sea animals. 7 Day News Journal discloses taht the contaminated water came from a Steel Factory. Factories are not cleaning their wastes, and instead dumping it on the ground and into the rivers. The pollution by the factories is not just killing fish and animals, but it is harming the people.
Views: 3968 VOA Burmese
CMS Global Action for Migratory Animals (English HD)
 
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The Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (also known as CMS or Bonn Convention) aims to conserve terrestrial, aquatic and avian migratory species throughout their range. It is an intergovernmental treaty, concluded under the aegis of the United Nations Environment Programme, concerned with the conservation of wildlife and habitats on a global scale.
Views: 3026 Bonn Convention
Inter-species Interaction - Ecology YouTube Project (in HD 720p)
 
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It is recommended that you watch in 720p if possible. More information below. After research and planning, we put together this informative video about three types of inter-species interaction: •Mutualism: Interaction between two species when both species benefit •Commensalism: Interactions in which one species benefits while the other is not affected •Parasitism: Interactions benefit one species while harming the other Music: Invaders Must Die - The Prodigy "Hey, you're eating yogurt!" - http://www.wav-sounds.com/parody/yogurt.wav Thanks for watching!
Views: 878 srh609
A Career in Ecology - Frankie Clare IoZ PhD student
 
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Frankie Clare IoZ PhD student - How did you become an Ecologist?
Views: 5911 BESeducation
♥ ECO-WARRIORS: The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society
 
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i've said it before and i'll say it again... The Sea Shepherds are "ECO-WARRIORS", not eco-terrorists! They're not eco-terrorists if they're the ones trying to assist in the ecology's preservation. It's like having two people: one is burning trees, the other is trying to put the fires out. Which is the "eco-terrorist"? Compassion is not terrorism... How are they "terrorists" for trying to prevent the illegal slaughter of endangered and protected species? Everyone knows they're not "real" pirates either. Pirates steal and kill. The Sea Shepherds are borrowing the current popularity of pirates in their attempt to raise the awareness on what's happening in the Southern Ocean. Publicity! That's all. They don't even use guns and haven't broken any laws. If they were terrorists, the CIA would've stormed them and shot Paul Watson just like they did with Osama bin Killed. Note: Paul is a lot easier to find. For people to get so much enjoyment out of harming something as beautiful and intelligent a Whale or a Dolphin is deplorable! Intelligence is the ability to live in harmony with the natural world. The slaughter of great whales has no place in the 21th century. An old Cree Indian Prophecy: Only after the last tree has been cut down, Only after the last fish has been caught, Only after the last river has been poisoned, Only then will you realize that money cannot be eaten. OK people will not ever stop eating animals, but there are guidelines that should be followed: 1) Don't kill animals whose subsistence is in question. 2) Kill quickly and humanely. 3) Replenish. 4) Respect an animal's sanctuary! The poachers ignore all of these basic common sense points of logic human decency. Japan is not a poor country anymore. Hasn't been for a long time. They needn't kill ANY Whales to survive. The Sea Shepherds are all about protecting a helpless species who are under attack by superior forces, just like if aliens with advanced technology were to attack humans! Pretending it's research doesn't excuse breaking a law. Some call the SSCS "ineffective" because they don't use enough force. Then some call them "terrorists" for using aggressive tactics. Like Locusts, poachers will deplete a species and lower it to endangered levels, then move on to the next one and claim "Well, this one over here is not endangered. There's nothing wrong with us hunting this kind". There's no healthy population of Whales. We have to save the oceans to save ourselves. If the oceans die, we die. People who call the Sea Shepherds terrorists don't seem to know much about terrorism. The Sea Shepherds have ALL their activities and their names and their faces up on your TV screen every week! If someone wants to call them terrorists, that means they're saying the japanese are terrified by stinkbombs ☺
Views: 2855 info145

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