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Search results “Ecology of sea animals” for the 2011
Shore ecology
 
23:59
Video about ecology of the shoreline.
Views: 9006 Whirlytunes
Lake Ecology & Role of Aquatic Plants
 
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DNR Water Resources Management Specialist Jay Schiefelbein discusses water quality, water clarity, and the role of aquatic plants in Lake Winnebago. March 31, 2011
Save Sea Turtles- Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)
 
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Buy the song on iTunes: http://bit.ly/tI0Jyl I love sea turtles. Please join me in making changes to help ensure their survival. This song is off my brand new EP, which can be purchased on iTunes or at: http://LindseyYung.com All the underwater footage from this video was shot by me in Maui. PLEASE SHARE THIS VIDEO AND SPREAD THE WORD. Thanks for watching and listening. Official Website: http://www.LindseyYung.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/LindseyYung Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LindseyYung
Views: 2736 Lindsey Yung Tuthill
Weddell Seal Ecology in Antarctica
 
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Every springtime in Antarctica Weddell seals return to Erebus Bay to give birth and raise their new pups. And every year a team of researchers and graduate students based at Montana State University returns to Antarctica to study the ecology of these iconic apex predators in this nearly pristine marine environment. Video features interviews with ecologists Robert Garrott and Jay Rotella, professors in the Ecology Department at MSU, and MSU graduate student Jen Mannas. Video production by Mary Lynn Price. More information at http://WeddellSealScience.com .
Views: 4888 WeddellSealScience
Threatened Beauty - Images of South Australia's unique marine ecology
 
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Threatened Beauty - Desalination plants pose threats to South Australia's unique gulf marine ecology. SaveOurGulfs.org.au is committed to raising public awareness and presenting alternative solutions to South Australia's current water management strategies. Please enjoy the wonderful diversity of life we have below our waves in the Gulfs St Vincent and Spencer in South Australia.
Views: 224 SaveOurGulfsAU
Ecology of the Red Sea and Arabian gulf
 
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from the The desert seas documentary: "The Arabian gulf seemed to be the ugly duckling of the two seas. Now it seems the gulf perform the final miracle and restock the reef. The parade of riches in the Red Sea relies almost on nothing. The harshness of the Arabian gulf has become its true wealth." هل تعلم ؟! ان الكائنات البحريه و المرجان في البحر الأحمر يتغذى ويعتمد اعتماد شبه كلي على عوالق و افرازات الزائده من المرجان و العوالق في الخليج العربي. شاهد المقطع للمزيد عن هذه المعلومه علماً بأن هذه العمليه البيئيه الرائعه سبحان الله مصوره اول مره.
Views: 622 wrefai
Galápagos Rift 2011: New Hydrothermal Vent Discovered
 
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On the ninth remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of the Galapágos Rift 2011 expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, the science team finally discovered the type of hydrothermal vent community they had been searching for. Clusters of tube worms, limpets, mussels, and anemones were seen to inhabit cracks in the lava bed where mineral-rich, geothermally heated water 'vents' out. Two species of tube worms were found in abundance: the giant Riftia pachyptila and also the much smaller, never observed in the Galápagos, Tevnia jerichonana. Brachyuran crabs, vent shrimp, and scale worms clung not only to the surrounding rock but also to the tube worms themselves in some cases. Extensive fields of dead and living clams surrounded the individual pockets of venting. Video courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Galapágos Rift Expedition 2011. Source: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1103/welcome.html
Views: 94872 oceanexplorergov
Shark extinction and its effect on ocean ecosystem - Gordon Ramsay
 
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Gordon Ramsay talks to a marine biologist about the effect that the popularity of shark fin soup is having on shark numbers. He learns about finning of sharks. In Gordon Ramsay's Shark Bait, the world's most famous chef will expose the shocking practices that are threatening the existence of one of the earth's most amazing creatures and confront the illicit fishermen, traders and diners who are responsible for the shark's precipitous decline.
Views: 16311 Gordon Ramsay
ScienceMan Digital Lesson - Biology - Intertidal Zone
 
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ScienceMan.com provides free digital lessons and technology integration help for teachers and students. In this digital lesson, ScienceMan discusses how the intertidal zone is unique and how intertidal organisms are specially adapted to survive in such a challenging environment. ScienceMan™ and ScienceMan Digital Lessons are protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Views: 5532 ScienceMandotcom
Ecosystems Song
 
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Here is a song I created to help my 6th grade students study. I hope you enjoy. Ecosystem Ecology how the living Interacts with their home Where they meet Eat and greet other species in biomes And the place where an organism lives, habitat Provides the things an organism needs Organisms of one species Population- species grouping More populations- communities Birds that flock, bugs and rocks, temperature and soil They make up ecosystems Eco-systems have a flow Sunlight, water, oxygen, temperature, soil Yeah so, Abiotic not life, no Biotic grows like plants, fungi, animals When the zone shuts down Food is low, ow, ow, ow, Space is down It's a crowd, owd, owd, owd Weather- hurricanes and snow That's how limiting factors make them leave their homes Adaptations change animals over and over Alter bodies physical, behavioral, behavioral Eating, finding homes Niche- a kind of role No matter day or night competition Species die off From the ocean to the land Animals killing and eating them Is it a predator, or is a prey? They will catch, kill their prey, it's what predation's for They gon' tear their food up Eco-systems have a flow Sunlight, water, oxygen, temperature, soil Yeah so, Abiotic not life, no Biotic grows like plants, fungi, animals When the zone shuts down Food is low, ow, ow, ow, Space is down It's a crowd, owd, owd, owd Weather- hurricanes and snow That's how limiting factors make them leave their homes A close relationship between two species and one benefits I'll tell you that there are three types of symbiosis Mutualism is the one that benefits each species When one isn't helped nor harmed, it's commensalism When a parasite harms a host, host, host, host Parasitism, live inside, or outside, on it Eco-systems have a flow Sunlight, water, oxygen, temperature, soil Yeah so, Abiotic not life, no Biotic grows like plants, fungi, animals When the zone shuts down Food is low, ow, ow, ow, Space is down It's a crowd, owd, owd, owd Weather- hurricanes and snow That's how limiting factors make them leave their homes
Views: 756508 ParrMr
Talk to the scientist:  Marine ecology
 
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This film (1) was created as a teacher resource for a KS3 and KS4 Biology lesson called "What animals live on the seafloor?" This film is the introduction to the lesson. Bryony Pearce, Marine ecologist at Marine Ecological Surveys (MES) talks about her role in the scientific research into the ecology of the Humber, off the east coast of the United Kingdom. In 2008, the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) commissioned Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) research into four main dredging regions in the United Kingdom -- the Thames, South Coast, East Coast and Humber. These studies involved experts from universities, survey companies and heritage organisations investigating the archaeology, geology and ecology of the seafloor. The aim of the studies was to ensure that we use the sea sustainably, without damaging its natural or physical heritage. This film was produced by Wessex Archaeology as part of the Explore the Seafloor project, funded by MALSF to promote the results of the RECs.
Views: 258 ExploretheSeafloor
Why Study Weddell Seals?
 
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A functioning population of marine predators in a nearly pristine Antarctic marine setting provides a unique opportunity to learn more about how these animals interact with their environment, and to better understand our world. Interview with Montana State University ecologist Dr. Jay Rotella on location at the Big Razorback Island Weddell seal colony in Erebus Bay of Antarctica's Ross Sea.
Views: 1615 WeddellSealScience
Talk to the Scientist : Biotopes
 
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This film (4) was created as a teacher resource for a KS3 and KS4 Biology lesson called "What animals live on the seafloor?" Bryony Pearce, Marine ecologist at Marine Ecological Surveys (MES) explains how ecologists create biotope maps of the seafloor during scientific research into the ecology of the Humber, off the east coast of the United Kingdom. In 2008, the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) commissioned Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) research into four main dredging regions in the United Kingdom -- the Thames, South Coast, East Coast and Humber. These studies involved experts from universities, survey companies and heritage organisations investigating the archaeology, geology and ecology of the seafloor. The aim of the studies was to ensure that we use the sea sustainably, without damaging its natural or physical heritage. This film was produced by Wessex Archaeology as part of the Explore the Seafloor project, funded by MALSF to promote the results of the RECs.
Views: 86 ExploretheSeafloor
My Sea Pansy Suspension-Feeding!
 
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A sea pansy that I found on Tybee Island next to Savannah GA. I thought it was dead when I picked it up for my ecology project (I've gotten alot of my tank animals from the beach anyway because I'm a poor high school student and they're free. Especially hermit crabs for my peacock mantis shrimp) but when I saw it squirming around I put it in my 55 gallon saltwater tank! I had no idea what these were untill I found it and so far none of the biology teachers I've asked had either. Its scientific name is Renilla reniformis. If I turn out all the lights in the room for about thirty minutes and then start poking it, it gives off these really bright ripples of light! I tried to get it on camera but my camera doesn't do too well in the dark. It's also really squirmy and I often find it in different parts of the tank every morning. ^-^ Int the video its stalk (peduncle) is on the side but it has since burrowed it into the ground. There is very little information on how to take care of these online so I will list what's kept it alive for at least the past 2 weeks. -I target feed it phytoplankton daily and then let some extra plankton loose in the tank. From what I've read it does photosynthesize but it gets most of its nutrition from suspension-feeding. I've also read that it has to eat alot, making it hard to keep. -Specific gravity: a little less than 1.024 -Nitrates: less than 10 ppm -I have a 2.5 inch deep sandbed with a bottom layer of live sand and a layer of crushed coral on top. There's a good bit of zooplankton swimming around in the crushed coral. -As you can see I have a lot of bubbles in my tank (My gut teels me that it needs a good bit of oxygen) -Temp 76-80 Degrees F I plan to be a marine invertebrate zoologist so I'm really happy I found this.
Views: 5336 Sone781
Talk to the Scientist: All
 
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This film was created as a teacher resource for a KS3 and KS4 Biology lesson called "What animals live on the seafloor?" This clip shows the whole film (sections 1 - 5) in its entirety. Bryony Pearce, Marine ecologist at Marine Ecological Surveys (MES) talks about the scientific research into the ecology of the Humber, off the east coast of the United Kingdom. In 2008, the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) commissioned Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) research into four main dredging regions in the United Kingdom -- the Thames, South Coast, East Coast and Humber. These studies involved experts from universities, survey companies and heritage organisations investigating the archaeology, geology and ecology of the seafloor. The aim of the studies was to ensure that we use the sea sustainably, without damaging its natural or physical heritage. This film was produced by Wessex Archaeology as part of the Explore the Seafloor project, funded by MALSF to promote the results of the RECs.
Views: 210 ExploretheSeafloor
CMS Global Action for Migratory Animals (English HD)
 
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The Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (also known as CMS or Bonn Convention) aims to conserve terrestrial, aquatic and avian migratory species throughout their range. It is an intergovernmental treaty, concluded under the aegis of the United Nations Environment Programme, concerned with the conservation of wildlife and habitats on a global scale.
Views: 2891 Bonn Convention
Census of Marine Life - Dr. Paul Snelgrove part 1
 
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Dr. Paul Snelgrove (Professor, Ocean Science Centre, Memorial University) Dr. Snelgrove is a professor at Memorial University's Ocean Science Centre specializing in marine community ecology. He is also a Canada Research Chair in Boreal and Cold Ocean Systems.
Views: 391 VanaquaSciLectures
Wildlife Conservation
 
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Students who are interested in the life sciences, whole organisms, ecology, and the biological aspects of the environment can find their interests met in the Wildlife Conservation major. Students in this program learn about wildlife management; conservation techniques; and non-domesticated animals, including insects and vertebrates. The curriculum builds from basic courses in biology, chemistry, and conservation to more specialized and supporting courses such as ecology, botany, and mammalogy. You also will take general education courses in computers, English, mathematics, social sciences, humanities, literature and the arts to ensure breadth in your undergraduate experience and to provide skills and knowledge necessary to the practice of conservation. For more information about Wildlife Conservation at the University of Delaware, check out: http://www.udel.edu/admissions/majorfinder/ Edited by: Laura Schultz '13
Ecology the Aquatic environment 1
 
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In this video I talk about the aquatic environment and why it's important.
Views: 373 FortuneFavorsPrep
Little Fishy Things Demo Video
 
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"Shaq's Little Fishy Things" is a bright and shiny ecology trip for kids through the world's most amazing ocean habitats where they meet and learn about some fascinating sea creatures through stunning underwater videos and graphics. Shaquille "Shaq" O'Neal, ecology advocate, famous basketball legend, and a hero to millions of families and their kids, hosts the trip through this undersea wonderland. On the journey, kids will meet Myrtle the Sea Turtle, Lenny the Blenny, Lilly the Lobster, Ernesto The Moray Eel and other amusing ocean inhabitants whose videos will spark investigations on the "Little Fishy Things" website, accessed through the APP. On the web-link, parents will find more videos, hands-on projects and fun follow-up to the APP experience to share with their children. In the APP, each of the dozen sea creatures has an associated video, a "Professor Fish" info module and pictures. The website allows kids and parents to drill down deeper into ocean ecology with activities and fun links. There are two hidden games in the APP (think "what would a worm do in his spare time" for a clue as to where to find the games). Don't bother to keep score, just touch the sea creature, move your finger and watch the action once you discover where the game is! "Shaq's Little Fishy Things" is the first in a series of similar APPs which, in an engaging and exciting way, help raise awareness of the magnificent seas that surround us all and the amazing creatures that live there in this "inner space and last frontier" on Earth.
Views: 124 LittleFishyThings
Talk to the Scientist: Benthic Macrofauna
 
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This film was created as a teacher resource for a KS3 and KS4 Biology lesson called "What animals live on the seafloor?". Bryony Pearce, Marine ecologist at Marine Ecological Surveys (MES) explains what benthic macrofauna are and why they were studied during scientific research into the ecology of the Humber, off the east coast of the United Kingdom. In 2008, the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) commissioned Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) research into four main dredging regions in the United Kingdom -- the Thames, South Coast, East Coast and Humber. These studies involved experts from universities, survey companies and heritage organisations investigating the archaeology, geology and ecology of the seafloor. The aim of the studies was to ensure that we use the sea sustainably, without damaging its natural or physical heritage. This film was produced by Wessex Archaeology as part of the Explore the Seafloor project, funded by MALSF to promote the results of the RECs.
Views: 344 ExploretheSeafloor
BSc (Hons) Marine Biology and Coastal Ecology field work in South Africa
 
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A video to introduce students to the field course that takes place at the start of the second year of BSc (Hons) Marine Biology and Coastal Ecology degree at the University of Plymouth. (I did the video editing for this project).
Views: 2888 Vaidas K
Aquatic Environments
 
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Aquatic Environments is a great aquarium store in Davenport, Iowa.
Views: 2889 Ted’s Fishroom
Galapagos ~ Life Under the Surface
 
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Video from my first 2 weeks snorkeling around San Cristobal Island, Galapagos. I was there studying marine ecology and conservation as a semester abroad at GAIAS. Chancey Macdonald.
Views: 316 spiraldiscourse
Parasite P.I.: Smithsonian Scientist Mark Torchin
 
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Mark Torchin, a marine ecologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama, talks about how he studies the parasites of invasive marine animals such as snails. Living and working on the Panama Canal, an epicenter of marine shipping, brings a massive influx and variety of invasive marine species that researchers like Mark can study and understand. Much of Mark's research focuses on biological invasions and the dynamics between the host, the parasites and the surrounding ecosystem. Read more about Mark's work here: http://www.stri.si.edu/english/scientific_staff/staff_scientist/scientist.php?id=39 Meet more Smithsonian Scientists at http://smithsonianscience.org
Views: 6653 Smithsonian
Talk to the Scientist: Humber REC Ecology Results
 
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This film (5) was created as a teacher resource for a KS3 and KS4 Biology lesson called "What animals live on the seafloor?". Bryony Pearce, Marine ecologist at Marine Ecological Surveys (MES) explains the results of scientific research into the ecology of the Humber, off the east coast of the United Kingdom. In 2008, the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) commissioned Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) research into four main dredging regions in the United Kingdom -- the Thames, South Coast, East Coast and Humber. These studies involved experts from universities, survey companies and heritage organisations investigating the archaeology, geology and ecology of the seafloor. The aim of the studies was to ensure that we use the sea sustainably, without damaging its natural or physical heritage. This film was produced by Wessex Archaeology as part of the Explore the Seafloor project, funded by MALSF to promote the results of the RECs.
Views: 56 ExploretheSeafloor
California Central Coast Kelp Forest Promo
 
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California Central Coast Kelp Forest DVD of our Ocean Creatures by Carol Georgi Have you ever wondered what lives under the kelp floating in our nearshore waters? The California Central Coast kelp forest is one of the most diverse places in the world and one of the least explored. Terry Lilley and Sue Sloan explore the undersea world of the kelp forests off California's Central Coast, filming a world of surprising beauty, color and diversity. Diving over 1000 times from kayaks, Lilley (marine biologist and former pro-surfer) and his assistant Sloan introduce us to the rich marine life of the kelp ecosystem. Watching this film, we easily see why these ecosystems, rarely found in Southern California, need to be protected by a national marine sanctuary. You can order a Kelp Forest DVD from SLO Surfrider Foundation, PO Box 13222, San Luis Obispo, CA. Please include a check made out to SLO Surfrider for $20, shipping is included. Watch a sample of the video to enjoy a mind-expanding view or our underwater world along the California Central Coast. Come with Terry Lilley and Sue Sloan as they descend into the world of the kelp forest off SLO County's central coast. Video and Narration by Biologist Terry Lilley and Assistant Sue Sloan This DVD shows many ocean creatures, including: giant lingcod, huge schools of rockfish, rare angle sharks, colorful sea slugs and anemones in every color of the rainbow, 300 pound seals, giant crabs and lobsters. Most of the Ocean Creature photos used in these articles are from this DVD. Jeff Pienack, Chair, Surfrider SLO
Views: 3303 underwater2web
Vertebrate Diversity: Mammals
 
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Class notes on Mammals
Views: 23775 Craig Savage
Killer Whale
 
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The killer whale lives in all three of Canada's oceans in a variety of habitats. Shot on British Columbia's beautiful coastline, this PSA presents facts about this unique whale's ecology. It also explains how threats like the accumulation of toxic chemicals in its food have caused four out of five populations of this species to become at risk in Canada.
Dr. Tunnicliffe Deep Ocean Part 1
 
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Verena Tunnicliffe, Director of VENUS Subsea Observatory and Professor, University of Victoria As the Director of VENUS, Verena Tunnicliffe ensures that scientists and citizens can get a peek at the underwater world. Her research focuses on the ecology and evolution of hot-vent animals and marine community history. View part 2: http://youtu.be/6cdyVLGXQIE
Views: 87 VanaquaSciLectures
Save The Sea Turtles: A Mini Documentary
 
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This is a mini documentary about sea turtles. Sea turtles are very important to the world. I worked very hard on this video. I hope you enjoy!
Views: 4219 sarahmgoodgirl
The North Sea (3 min version)
 
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Yorkshire Wildlife Trust's 3 minute video showing the rich diversity of life in the North Sea. A promotional video to encourage people to sign a scale on a petition fish in order to lobby Government to create an extensive range of Marine Protected Areas.
Views: 305 Andy Jackson
Odd Couple - Fish and Shrimp's symbiotic relationship
 
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A fish and a shrimp share a hole. Shrimp does all the work and the fish just watches over. I bet the fish is blackmailing the shrimp.
Views: 31295 Antonio Silva
Marine Animal Senses
 
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A poorly-shot video about marine animal senses.
Views: 293 Jules Powis
South Africa - Two Ocean Sea Life - Travel  Video
 
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Taken at the Two Ocean Aquarium in Cape Town, South Africa. When in Cape Town check it out and dive with the sharks. http://WilsonStockPhotos.com
Views: 760 Terry Wilson
ADAPTATION - Ep.1 Adapting itself to the environment [PROMO ENG]
 
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Although the Earth was formed some 4.500 million years ago, it had to wait another thousand million years before life emerged in the primeval soup of the Precambrian ocean. Our world had taken the decisive step towards its differentiation in a lifeless solar system. Appropriate physical and chemical conditions allowed the appearance of matter capable of perpetuating itself: life had emerged in a humble but unstoppable way. The complexity of living forms grew as environmental conditions changed. Body structures became more sophisticated giving rise to creatures that were more capable of exploiting the energy of the environment in order to metabolise it and convert it into living matter capable of reproducing its genetic endowment. The first bacteria and single-cell algae made way for the first invertebrates and from those soft functional creatures arose a new much more complex order with an internal skeleton: the vertebrates. The appearance of fish marked the starting point for one of life's greatest adventures. Oceans and seas had been conquered by plants and animals, but beyond, outside the protective water, stretched the world of the planet's surface, a different world full of promise but also full of innumerable obstacles and limitations. And living creatures, after preparing themselves for it for three thousand million years, decided to go out and conquer it. EPISODE I: ADAPTING ITSELF TO THE ENVIRONMENT The surface of the Earth is very diverse. Different ecosystems form different worlds where physical environmental conditions form barriers for the species. If a living creature wants to establish itself in any of the worlds on the surface it will have to learn to overcome the particular limitations presented by temperature, humidity, altitude and other similar factors. It is a task which is impossible to perform for isolated individuals, but life has such a powerful genetic tool that it has made it possible: evolution.
Views: 3672 explorafilmstv
Part 1 - 'Do Marine Protected Areas work?' Professor Hugh Possingham
 
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Do Marine Protected Areas work, a presentation to the South Australian Parliament held on 5th April 2011. Part 1 introduces the basic scientific principles behind the Marine reserve systems. To view - Part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mcRt71XQtI To view - Part 3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Euf5Pi8rU5Y Professor Hugh Possingham is an Australian Professorial Fellow in Integrative Biology. He received his PhD from the University of Oxford in 1987. His research projects are in the field of decision theory in conservation biology: · Reserve design, biodiversity management and fire regime management · Population viability analysis (PVA) - including the development of ALEX · Pollination ecology · Metapopulation dynamics · Ecological economics · Stochastic modelling · Biodiversity and climate change · Population dynamics of marine organisms · Marine reserve design · Marine population dynamics · Avian community ecology · Edge effects and fragmentation · Landscape ecology · Behavioural and population ecology of parasitoids Expanded biography Professor Hugh Possingham completed Applied Mathematics Honours at The University of Adelaide in 1984. After attaining a Rhodes Scholarship Hugh completed his D.Phil at Oxford University in 1987. Postdoctoral research periods followed at Stanford University and ANU (as an ARC QEII Fellow). In 1991 he took a Lectureship, later Senior Lectureship, in Applied Mathematics at The University of Adelaide. In 1995 he was appointed Foundation Chair of the Department of Environmental Science at The University of Adelaide. In July 2000 Hugh took up a joint Professorship between Ecology and Mathematics at The University of Queensland. He was elected to The Australian Academy of Science in 2005 and now sits on their council. Professor Possingham is currently an ARC Federation fellow (2007 -- 2011) and Director of a Commonwealth Environment Research Facility www.aeda.edu.au. The Possingham lab includes nine postdoctoral researchers and twenty-five PhD students working on empirical and theoretical aspects of the applied population ecology of plants and animals. Particular areas of recent research include marine reserve design, optimal landscape reconstruction for birds, metapopulation dynamics of plants and animals, population viability analysis, kangaroo and koala management, and optimal weed control (as part of the Weeds CRC). The lab has a unifying interest in environmental applications of decision theory. Hugh has published over 100 refereed articles and book chapters. Hugh has a variety of broader public roles including past Chair of the federal government Biological Diversity Advisory Committee, member of the NHT Advisory Committee, member of the state Ministerial Advisory Committee on Vegetation Management, member of the Research and Conservation Committee of Birds Australia and member of the Board of Greening Australia, Queensland. The lab has a unifying interest in environmental applications of decision theory. Its reserve design software, Marxan (Eureka Prize 2009) is now used in over 100 countries to build their marine reserve system designs. Hugh has co-authored over 220 Web of Science papers which have received over 5500 citations. He sits on 16 boards and committees external to the University including: Member of the Queensland Smart State Council, Birds Australia Atlas Advisory Committee, Wildcountry Council, FASTS and The Myer Foundation Sustainability and Environment Committee. Professor Hugh Possingham's research interests are in pure and applied population ecology: efficient reserve design and habitat reconstruction; optimal management of populations for conservation, pest control and harvesting; survey methods for detecting bird decline; and metapopulation dynamics of mound springs snails.
What is a salt marsh?
 
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Ever wonder about the grassy, marshy areas that form where rivers meet the sea? Salt Marshes are some of the worlds most productive, and vulnerable, ecosystems. Watch as biologist Susan Adamowicz, from the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, explains the history and importance of these areas to wildlife and people.
Dr. Tunnicliffe Deep Ocean Part 2
 
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Verena Tunnicliffe, Director of VENUS Subsea Observatory and Professor, University of Victoria As the Director of VENUS, Verena Tunnicliffe ensures that scientists and citizens can get a peek at the underwater world. Her research focuses on the ecology and evolution of hot-vent animals and marine community history.
Views: 65 VanaquaSciLectures
Water Pollution Affect Animals Too, Sparkcleanh2o
 
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water,Sparkclean,h2o,Chemicals and Pollutants added to water not only affect humans but animals as well.
Views: 1551 MyCleanwater
Horse Conch Eats Lightning Whelk: from "In the Grass, On the Reef"
 
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http://wfsu.org/blog-coastal-health/ In the Grass, On the Reef: Testing the Ecology of Fear WFSU-TV Wednesday, July 3 at 10:00 AM/ ET If you don't live in our viewing area (N. FL, S. GA), the program will be uploaded to the "In the Grass, On the Reef" web site: http://wfsu.org/blog-coastal-health/ The horse conch is the largest predatory snail in Florida Waters. They're practically ecosystems onto themselves, often covered in barnacles, crepidula snails, bryozoans, and other small marine animals that affix themselves to hard surfaces (including the occasional oyster). They have these massive bright orange bodies inside their shells. In this video, you'll see horse conchs roaming seagrass beds in the Florida Gulf, specifically St. Joseph Bay and Bay Mouth Bar. This is an excerpt from the new "In the Grass, On the Reef" documentary, "Testing the Ecology of Fear." The program follows Dr. David Kimbro and Dr. Randall Hughes as they study predator/ prey interactions in salt marshes, oyster reefs, and on the seagrass beds and sand flats of Bay Mouth Bar. Bay Mouth Bar contains the largest diversity of predatory snails in the world, and an overwhelming variety of clams, crabs, worms, sand dollars, sea stars and others. But the horse conch is the lion of this habitat. As the largest predator, the horse conch affects the ecosystem by eating other predatory snails, who in turn eat clams. The clams eat phytoplankton in the water, filtering it clean, so by controlling clam predators, the horse conch benefits the clams and the water. But are its effects over other snails like banded tulips and lightning whelks purely consumptive, or might fear control them as well? The fear of being eaten might change the behavior of these intermediate predators, affecting more individuals that a horse conch can eat. Through their research, Dr. Hughes and Dr. Kimbro hope to find out how predators might scare smaller animals in economically and and ecologically ecosystems.
Views: 11041 WFSU Public Media
Don't Rock the Rocks & Crab care & ecology
 
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Don't Rock the Rocks & Crab Care in Pails. How to lift and replace rocks on the beach so that the tiny creatures who live underneath are not disturbed. 2. Crab Care in Pails. See 'crabs in pail' clip note. 3. Importance of crabs in Boundary Bay ecosystem
Views: 2883 JA Crablady
Historical Contingency in Community Assembly
 
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Tadashi Fukami, Department of Biology, Stanford University, studies ecological and evolutionary community assembly, with emphasis on historical contingency in community structure, ecosystem functioning, biological invasion and ecological restoration, using experimental, theoretical and comparative methods involving bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and animals. [Show ID: 21360]
Views: 552 UCTVSeminars
South East Asian Ecology (T2G3Y1011)
 
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Field Trip for SEA Ecology Students Group 2 of Trimester 2 Year 2010-2011
Views: 97 Ramesh Boonratana
In the Grass, On the Reef: Testing the Ecology of Fear
 
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http://wfsu.org/blog-coastal-health/ Dr. David Kimbro and Dr. Randall Hughes are researchers at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory. They work in coastal ecosystems like salt marshes, oyster reefs, seagrass beds, and sand flats where many commercially important species reside. This program looks at work they are doing with predator prey relationships. How do predators affect important foundation species like oysters and marsh cordgrass. When top predators eat the smaller animals that consume oysters and grasses, they help these ecosystem builders flourish. But it might be that fear of top predators makes intermediate consumers change their behavior, and affect the foundation species more profoundly than mere consumption. This documentary is part of the In the Grass, On the Reef multimedia project. The IGOR web site features a blog that tracks Randall and David's studies, and where coastal life is celebrated through food, art, and music. Through photos and videos, you can learn about how coastal ecosystems function, and what impact they have on human life.
Views: 1611 WFSU Public Media

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