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Ethnographic Essay Lecture
 
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Ethnographic Essay Lecture
Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes
 
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http://erj-books.club/readonline/?item=0226206831&lan=en
Views: 127 Jennifer Jackson
Ethnography
 
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This video describes how to write an ethnographic paper for Cultural Anthropology.
Views: 1292 Stella Hansen
What is CLINICAL ETHNOGRAPHY? What does CLINICAL ETHNOGRAPHY mean? CLINICAL ETHNOGRAPHY meaning
 
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What is CLINICAL ETHNOGRAPHY? What does CLINICAL ETHNOGRAPHY mean? CLINICAL ETHNOGRAPHY meaning - CLINICAL ETHNOGRAPHY definition - CLINICAL ETHNOGRAPHY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Clinical ethnography is a term first used by Gilbert Herdt and Robert Stoller in a series of papers in the 1980s. As Herdt defines it, clinical ethnography is the intensive study of subjectivity in cultural context...clinical ethnography is focused on the microscopic understanding of sexual subjectivity and individual differences within cross-cultural communities. What distinguishes clinical ethnography from anthropological ethnography in general is (a) the application of disciplined clinical training to ethnographic problems and (b) developmental concern with desires and meanings as they are distributed culturally within groups and across the course of life. Clinical ethnography has strong similarities to person-centered ethnography, a term used by Robert I. Levy, a psychoanalytically trained psychiatrist, to describe his anthropological fieldwork in Tahiti and Nepal in the 1960s-1980s and used by many of his students and interlocutors. In practice the two approaches overlap but seem to differ in emphasis: clinical ethnography seems to be used more by anthropologists writing about sexuality or medical anthropology (particularly psychiatric anthropology, e.g. Luhrmann 2000, or anthropology of mental illness), while person-centered ethnography, though sometimes addressing these topics, more often focuses on the study of self and emotion cross-culturally. Person-centered anthropology also implies a style of ethnographic writing that emphasizes psychological case studies. Both represent a continuation of an older tradition within psychological anthropology and Culture and Personality studies particularly. Scholars in this tradition have had their primary training in anthropology or psychiatry (or rarely both) and have conducted ethnographic fieldwork strongly informed by psychodynamic theories (though not necessarily orthodox Freudian theory), some degree of training in psychiatric or clinical psychological interviewing techniques, and attention to a set of issues including the role of culture in or the cross-cultural study of emotions, sexuality, identity, the experience of self, and mental health. Figures in this larger tradition include but are not limited to: Jean Briggs, George Devereux, Cora DuBois, A. Irving Hallowell, Abram Kardiner, Ralph Linton, Melford Spiro, and at least tangentially Gregory Bateson, Margaret Mead, and Marvin Opler. Active research and training programs in clinical ethnography today include the Clinical Ethnography and Mental Health track in the Department of Comparative Human Development at the University of Chicago, and some of the qualitative researchers at the National Sexuality Resource Center, directed by Gilbert Herd at San Francisco State University. Aside from Herdt, scholars using the term include Andrew Boxer, Bertram J. Cohler, and Tanya Luhrmann, as well as many of their students.
Views: 139 The Audiopedia
Writing-up Qualitative Research
 
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Looks at a range of issues that need thinking about when writing up qualitative research. These include: getting started, free-writing, organization – chronological, thematic etc. – focus, drop files, getting feedback, details, tightening up, style, conclusions and editing. This was a lecture given to postgraduate (graduate) students at the University of Huddersfield as part of a course on Qualitative Data Analysis. To learn more about social research methods you might be interested in this new, inexpensive, postgraduate, distance learning course: MSc Social Research and Evaluation. The course is delivered entirely via the Internet. http://sre.hud.ac.uk/ Becker, H. S. (1986). Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish your Thesis, Book or Article. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press. Elbow, P. (1981) Writing with Power: Techniques for Mastering the Writing Process. New York: Oxford University Press Wolcott, H. F. (2009) Writing up qualitative research (3rd ed.). Newbury Park, Calif. ; London: Sage.
Views: 43610 Graham R Gibbs
Dell Hymes' SPEAKING Grid\Acronym,Ethnography of Communication
 
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Analyzing Hymes' notion of SPEAKING with examples. Background song: Far East Movement- Rocketeer\instrumental.
Views: 26740 Tsts Salah
Sarah Vachon-Ethnographic Essay
 
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Ethnographic Video about the Subculture "Gym Goers at BSU" English 104- Ball State University
Views: 122 MacKenzie Smith
Writing Project ethnographer report Large
 
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Western Kentucky Writing project
Views: 127 ChrisPassmore1
Ethnography of Communication - Sociolinguistics (Lecture 101)
 
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Ethnography of Communication Sociolinguistics
Culture Semiotics Rhetoric Lecture
 
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This lecture is about how to think about your typical, recurrent meeting in terms of culture, semiotics and rhetoric. Hartman is arguing that we need to understand the cultures of our workplaces in order to think about whether or not we are part of a "good" community. This lecture and the handout that goes with it will provide you with a way of thinking about and writing your ethnographic study of a typical, recurrent meeting.
Views: 1116 GrantAJ3
Ethnography
 
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Ethnography (from Greek ἔθνος ethnos "folk, people, nation" and γράφω grapho "I write") is the systematic study of people and cultures. It is designed to explore cultural phenomena where the researcher observes society from the point of view of the subject of the study. An ethnography is a means to represent graphically and in writing the culture of a group. The word can thus be said to have a "double meaning," which partly depends on whether it is used as a count noun or uncountably. The resulting field study or a case report reflects the knowledge and the system of meanings in the lives of a cultural group. Ethnography, as the empirical data on human societies and cultures, was pioneered in the biological, social, and cultural branches of anthropology but has also become popular in the social sciences in general—sociology, communication studies, history—wherever people study ethnic groups, formations, compositions, resettlements, social welfare characteristics, materiality, spirituality, and a people's ethnogenesis. The typical ethnography is a holistic study and so includes a brief history, and an analysis of the terrain, the climate, and the habitat. In all cases it should be reflexive, make a substantial contribution toward the understanding of the social life of humans, have an aesthetic impact on the reader, and express a credible reality. An ethnography records all observed behavior and describes all symbol-meaning relations using concepts that avoid casual explanations. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1157 Audiopedia
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
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The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 727981 Kent Löfgren
What your speaking style, like, says about you | Vera Regan | TEDxDublin
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. How we use language - our accent, expressions, and the structure of our sentences - changes from region to region. Vera Regan explains why we should listen to these differences, and why language can act as a cultural barometer. Sociolinguist Vera Regan is a researcher at University College Dublin, and her work explores the relationship between our cultural landscape and our changing language. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 2999028 TEDx Talks
Ethnography
 
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Ethnography is a research method designed to explore cultural phenomena where the researcher observes society from the point of view of the subject of the study. An ethnography is a means to represent graphically and in writing the culture of a group. The word can thus be said to have a "double meaning," which partly depends on whether it is used as a count noun or uncountably. The resulting field study or a case report reflects the knowledge and the system of meanings in the lives of a cultural group. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 317 encyclopediacc
Clinical ethnography | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Clinical ethnography Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Clinical ethnography is a term first used by Gilbert Herdt and Robert Stoller in a series of papers in the 1980s. As Herdt defines it, clinical ethnography is the intensive study of subjectivity in cultural context...clinical ethnography is focused on the microscopic understanding of sexual subjectivity and individual differences within cross-cultural communities. What distinguishes clinical ethnography from anthropological ethnography in general is (a) the application of disciplined clinical training to ethnographic problems and (b) developmental concern with desires and meanings as they are distributed culturally within groups and across the course of life. Clinical ethnography has strong similarities to person-centered ethnography, a term used by Robert I. Levy, a psychoanalytically trained psychiatrist, to describe his anthropological fieldwork in Tahiti and Nepal in the 1960s-1980s and used by many of his students and interlocutors. In practice the two approaches overlap but seem to differ in emphasis: clinical ethnography seems to be used more by anthropologists writing about sexuality or medical anthropology (particularly psychiatric anthropology, e.g. Luhrmann 2000, or anthropology of mental illness), while person-centered ethnography, though sometimes addressing these topics, more often focuses on the study of self and emotion cross-culturally. Person-centered anthropology also implies a style of ethnographic writing that emphasizes psychological case studies.Both represent a continuation of an older tradition within psychological anthropology and Culture and Personality studies particularly. Scholars in this tradition have had their primary training in anthropology or psychiatry (or rarely both) and have conducted ethnographic fieldwork strongly informed by psychodynamic theories (though not necessarily orthodox Freudian theory), some degree of training in psychiatric or clinical psychological interviewing techniques, and attention to a set of issues including the role of culture in or the cross-cultural study of emotions, sexuality, identity, the experience of self, and mental health. Figures in this larger tradition include but are not limited to: Jean Briggs, George Devereux, Cora DuBois, A. Irving Hallowell, Abram Kardiner, Ralph Linton, Melford Spiro, and at least tangentially Gregory Bateson, Margaret Mead, and Marvin Opler. Active research and training programs in clinical ethnography today include the Clinical Ethnography and Mental Health track in the Department of Comparative Human Development at the University of Chicago, and some of the qualitative researchers at the National Sexuality Resource Center, directed by Gilbert Herd at San Francisco State University. Aside from Herdt, scholars using the term include Andrew Boxer, Bertram J. Cohler, and Tanya Luhrmann, as well as many of their students.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Trinidad: How We Made Short Ethnographic Films
 
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We hope you enjoyed the Trinidad series of films. This film concludes by exploring how we made these videos in the field site. This short documentary film was made as part of the UCL Global Social Media Impact Study (http://whywepost.com). Funded by the European Research Council (ERC Project 2011-AdG-295486). CREDITS Filmmaker: [ADD FILMMAKER NAME HERE] Anthropologist: [ADD ANTHROPOLOGIST NAME HERE] Thanks to: [ADD THANKS TO DETAILS HERE]
Views: 932 UCL Why We Post
What is THICK DESCRIPTION? What does THICK DESCRIPTION mean? THICK DESCRIPTION meaning & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is THICK DESCRIPTION? What does THICK DESCRIPTION mean? THICK DESCRIPTION meaning - THICK DESCRIPTION definition - THICK DESCRIPTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In the fields of anthropology, sociology, religious studies, and human and organizational development, a thick description of a human behavior is one that explains not just the behavior, but its context as well, such that the behavior becomes meaningful to an outsider. The term was introduced by the 20th century philosopher Gilbert Ryle and later developed by anthropologist Clifford Geertz in his The Interpretation of Cultures (1973) to describe his own method of doing ethnography (Geertz 1973:5-6, 9-10). Since then, the term and the methodology it represents has gained currency in the social sciences and beyond. Today, "thick description" is used in a variety of fields, including the type of literary criticism known as New Historicism. In his essay "Thick Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture" (1973), Geertz explains that he adopted the term from philosopher Gilbert Ryle, specifically his lecture "What is le Penseur doing?" Geertz's "thick description" approach has become increasingly recognized as a method of symbolic anthropology, enlisted as a working antidote to overly technocratic, mechanistic means of understanding cultures, organizations, and historical settings. Influenced by Gilbert Ryle, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Max Weber, Paul Ricoeur, and Alfred Schutz, the method of descriptive ethnography that came to be associated with Geertz is credited with resuscitating field research from an endeavor of ongoing objectification—the focus of research being "out there"—to a more immediate undertaking, where participant observation embeds the researcher in the enactment of the settings being reported. Geertz is revered for his pioneering field methods and clear, accessible prose writing style. He was considered "for three decades...the single most influential cultural anthropologist in the United States." He served until his death as professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.
Views: 9165 The Audiopedia
How to do sampling in qualitative and ethnographic research?
 
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Sampling methods in qualitative research differ from sampling in quantitative research. The goal of interpretive-qualitative research and respective qualitative research designs is to provide an in-depth understanding and thus a representative sample of the entire population is not needed. In this video, I will briefly introduce four common sampling approaches in qualitative research: 1) purposeful sampling (also called purposive sampling), 2) snowball sampling, 3) convenience sampling and 4) quota sampling.
Views: 229 Johanna Gollnhofer
Note Taking in the Field - Squatch Style
 
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A video tutorial in taking field-notes, covering preparation, field conduct, note-taking technique, and concluding matters.
Views: 163 Nathaniel Stoll
Michael Taussig. Fictocriticism 2010
 
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http://www.egs.edu/ Michael Taussig, philosopher, talking about Corn-Wolf, writing, craft presence and storytelling. In the lecture Michael Taussig discusses the concepts of theory, fieldwork, diaries, works, in progress, documentary, Roland Barthes focusing on Mauss, gift, Derrida, shamanism, fetishism, culture, mimesis, alterity, Adorno, form, essay, art, politics, nature, magic, science, social, anthropology, Benjamin, Berger, EGS, European Graduate School. Public open lecture for the students and faculty of the European Graduate School EGS Media and Communication Studies department program Saas-Fee Switzerland Europe 2010 Michael Taussig. Fictocriticism can be described as a reaction to theory, or a kind of anti-theory. In this seminar, Taussig discusses social anthropology and fieldwork, notebooking and diary writing, as a way of being in and seeing the world. Fictocriticism blends fact and fiction, ethnographic observation, and cultural history. Taussig's work draws strongly from Benjamin and Adorno. Michael Taussig, Ph.D., is an Australian-born anthropologist known for his provocative ethnographic studies and unconventional style as an academic. He studied medicine in Australia at the University of Sydney, and he earned a Ph.D. in anthropology at the London School of Economics. He is currently a professor of anthropology at Columbia University in New York. Strongly influenced by both the Frankfurt School of critical theory and French post-structuralism, Michael Taussig was part of the shift during the 1980s within the field of anthropology toward an increasing mistrust of cultural analyses from the perspective of the dominant culture, i.e. Western capitalist culture. It was his early experiences as a doctor in Colombia in the late 1960s that influenced a fundamental change in his conception of the role of stories and narratives, over and against objective scholarship, in cultural formation. Ethnography became a conscious positive force in culture, as no account was intrinsically innocent or objective any longer. This led Michael Taussig to begin intermixing fact and fiction in his ethnographic studies, thus his status as a figure of controversy in the field of anthropology. The style and message of Michael Taussig's work derive from the impressions formed from his early experiences with conflicting cultural narratives in the struggle between the guerrillas and the paramilitaries in Colombia. This came across in the early book The Devil and Commodity Fetishism in South America (1980), which is a radical reverse analysis of capitalist culture through the viewpoint of the culture of indigenous people in Colombia and Bolivia. Through the analysis of the magical beliefs of indigenous peasants about striking a deal with the devil and baptizing money, he finds in these stories not the cultural sediment of a pre-capitalist belief system, but rather an explanation of the workings of capitalism from the perspective of the exploited class. Michael Taussig's second book, Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man (1987), went further in the application of the ethnographic case study model which he was fashioning. In this work, Michael Taussig attempts an exploration of the 'epistemic murk' and 'the fiction of the real' in the interrelation between colonialist terror and shamanistic healing in Colombia from the nineteenth through the twentieth century. Michael Taussig finds in these two cultural forces neither an opposition nor a dialectical synthesis, but a kind of reflective co-creation within the 'space of death' of colonialist terror, opening up forces of order and chaos which did not exist hitherto in these regions (Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man). Michael Taussig is the author of The Devil and Commodity Fetishism in South America (1980), Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study in Terror and Healing (1987), The Nervous System (1992), Mimesis and Alterity: A Particular History of the Senses (1993), The Magic of the State (1997), Defacement: Public Secrecy and the Labor of the Negative (1999), Law in a Lawless Land: Diary of a Limpieza in Colombia (2003), My Cocaine Museum (2004), Walter Benjamin's Grave (2006), and What Color is the Sacred? (2009).
Taking Solid Field Notes
 
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mathods
Views: 1374 DrKnoell
BRIAN STREET - The LETTER Project
 
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"The LETTER Project: Learning for Empowerment Through Training in Ethnographic Research" APA Citation: Street, B. (2014, April 27). The LETTER project: Learning for empowerment through training in ethnographic research. [Webinar]. In Global Conversations in Literacy Research Web Seminar Series. Retrieved fromhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFKPiGgNJ4E. This webinar was presented live on March 27, 2014 for Global Conversations in Literacy Research 2013-2014 Series" (http://globalconversationsinliteracy.wordpress.com) Dr. Street's web seminar has addressed The LETTER Project. Started in India from discussions between a local women's NGO, Nirantar, dedicated to Women's Empowerment Through Education, the programme commenced in 2005 with a series of workshops arranged by Nirantar and the Asia-South-Pacific Bureau of Everyday Literacies in Africa. Ethnographic Studies of Literacy and Numeracy Practices in Ethiopia Everyday Literacies in Africa. Ethnographic Studies of Literacy and Numeracy Practices in Ethiopia Adult Education with participants from Nepal, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Afghanistan and India. The project then moved to Ethiopia in which 20 teachers from around the country participated in this highly generative programme, and a book was written locally and published. A current project is underway in Uganda linking Makerere University with Addis Ababa University (Ethiopia), Kwa-Zulu-Natal University (South Africa) and Kings College London and the Institute of Education, London (UK). Two new features of The LETTER Project are the writing of reading material for learners, using ethnographic approaches to explore original (oral) material such as local stories and practices, and secondly, each of the participants has been asked to develop and teach a short training programme in literacy for adults using ethnographic material. Thus training for teaching is part of the LETTER Project now. The main focus of The LETTER Project was on approaches to exploring everyday literacy and numeracy in local communities using ethnographic-style methodologies, and its basic principles are that of helping the literacy learners to understand more clearly how they regard 'literacy' and numeracy, and how they are already engaging with it as an essential first step towards helping them to learn more. Developing detailed local ethnographic perspectives will be a particularly effective tool for challenging assumptions and generalisations about both literacy and learning; ethnographic explorations of the everyday are a necessary part of any pedagogic activity, whether with adults or children, whether in Europe or in the contexts of international development.
Looking Back - A collaborative ethnographic documentary
 
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From Madonna and Ving Rhames to Michael Jackson and Matt Damon. "Looking Back" is a self-reflexive 'feel-good' ethnographic film. Following the weekly rehearsals of the 'Breakthrough' drama group for individuals with different types of learning disabilities. By pretending to be someone else we discover ourselves and by looking back at the whole process of becoming another we end up being a creative character in our own documentary.
Views: 202 João Meirinhos
anthropology observation paper
 
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an observation paper for my anthropology class about a year with frog and toad i dont own frog and toad, i dont own kingdom hearts
Views: 184 Andrew Pfefferkorn
What Is The Purpose Of An Ethnographic Study?
 
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"What Is The Purpose Of An Ethnographic Study? Watch more videos for more knowledge What Is The Purpose Of An Ethnographic Study ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/W8MhRgAbxaU What Is An Ethnographic Study? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/GJHHx4udPvc Is An Ethnographic Study Qualitative Or ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/bo-xiaKSqXI Ethnography. Part 1 of 2 on Ethnography and ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/V8doV3P0us4 What Is An Ethnographic Research Design? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/PGWVwozFBFk What Is An Ethnographic Study In Sociology? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/_tTCdkqZ9Ag What Is Ethnographic Fieldwork And Why Is It ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/LBaCS1hXZsI Ethnography - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/GixIqVINkVw What Is A Ethnographic Research Design? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/8VfXkqovneo What is ETHNOGRAPHY? What does ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/xxbc1RKmdTM Introduction to Ethnographic Methods - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/b8R8alOqKPU Ethnography - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/6lIzz3DlEWQ Ethnographic Research - YouTube http://www.youtube.com.sg/watch/0fM_CJ5vDK4 Ethnographic interview, Anthropology Virtual ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/bKdSBULiYms Ethnography: Ellen Isaacs at TEDxBroadway - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/nV0jY5VgymI Lean Leadership: An ethnographic study - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/E1CNOHacHTg Educational Research ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/rVNopdlGKqI Design Ethnography - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/dSWP4zR1o8w "
Views: 474 Ask Question II
Creative Writing Program
 
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Emerson College offers a 5 week Creative Writing Program where students can improve their creativity and writing style.
Views: 136 Cindy Rodriguez
Michael Taussig. What is An Essay? Sacrifice and Responsibility. 2010
 
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http://www.egs.edu/ Michael Taussig, philosopher and anthropologist, talking about writing, essay, text and the place of diary in fieldwork. In the lecture Michael Taussig discusses the concepts of heroism, seasons, Georges Bataille focusing on sacrifice in relationship to modern states and primitive. The lecture discusses the general economy, restricted economy, Foucault, diffusion, responsibility, sacred, sacrifice. EGS, European Graduate School. Public open lecture for the students and faculty of the European Graduate School EGS Media and Communication Studies department program Saas-Fee Switzerland Europe 2010 Michael Taussig. Fictocriticism can be described as a reaction to theory, or a kind of anti-theory. In this seminar, Taussig discusses social anthropology and fieldwork, notebooking and diary writing, as a way of being in and seeing the world. Fictocriticism blends fact and fiction, ethnographic observation, and cultural history. Taussig's work draws strongly from Benjamin and Adorno. Michael Taussig, Ph.D., is an Australian-born anthropologist known for his provocative ethnographic studies and unconventional style as an academic. He studied medicine in Australia at the University of Sydney, and he earned a Ph.D. in anthropology at the London School of Economics. He is currently a professor of anthropology at Columbia University in New York. Strongly influenced by both the Frankfurt School of critical theory and French post-structuralism, Michael Taussig was part of the shift during the 1980s within the field of anthropology toward an increasing mistrust of cultural analyses from the perspective of the dominant culture, i.e. Western capitalist culture. It was his early experiences as a doctor in Colombia in the late 1960s that influenced a fundamental change in his conception of the role of stories and narratives, over and against objective scholarship, in cultural formation. Ethnography became a conscious positive force in culture, as no account was intrinsically innocent or objective any longer. This led Michael Taussig to begin intermixing fact and fiction in his ethnographic studies, thus his status as a figure of controversy in the field of anthropology. The style and message of Michael Taussig's work derive from the impressions formed from his early experiences with conflicting cultural narratives in the struggle between the guerrillas and the paramilitaries in Colombia. This came across in the early book The Devil and Commodity Fetishism in South America (1980), which is a radical reverse analysis of capitalist culture through the viewpoint of the culture of indigenous people in Colombia and Bolivia. Through the analysis of the magical beliefs of indigenous peasants about striking a deal with the devil and baptizing money, he finds in these stories not the cultural sediment of a pre-capitalist belief system, but rather an explanation of the workings of capitalism from the perspective of the exploited class. Michael Taussig's second book, Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man (1987), went further in the application of the ethnographic case study model which he was fashioning. In this work, Michael Taussig attempts an exploration of the 'epistemic murk' and 'the fiction of the real' in the interrelation between colonialist terror and shamanistic healing in Colombia from the nineteenth through the twentieth century. Michael Taussig finds in these two cultural forces neither an opposition nor a dialectical synthesis, but a kind of reflective co-creation within the 'space of death' of colonialist terror, opening up forces of order and chaos which did not exist hitherto in these regions (Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man). Michael Taussig is the author of The Devil and Commodity Fetishism in South America (1980), Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study in Terror and Healing (1987), The Nervous System (1992), Mimesis and Alterity: A Particular History of the Senses (1993), The Magic of the State (1997), Defacement: Public Secrecy and the Labor of the Negative (1999), Law in a Lawless Land: Diary of a Limpieza in Colombia (2003), My Cocaine Museum (2004), Walter Benjamin's Grave (2006), and What Color is the Sacred? (2009).
From Field Notes to a Thesis Argument and Beyond
 
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How to take your research field notes and create first an effective thesis argument/thesis statement based on the evidence you collected. Then how to create a research paper based on thesis argument and supported by the evidence/field notes you collected.
Views: 242 Sean David Hobbs
Digital Ethnography: Guitar Riffs in Different Musical Genres
 
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By: Patrick Panlasigui ANTHROPOLOGY 269 Section AC Jason de Leon March 05 2010 "Final Project: Digital Ethnography"
Views: 208 Patrick Panlasigui
The Phenomenology of Writing
 
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C. Formisano ETEC 540 Assignment 2
Views: 93 Colleen Formisano
How to Write a Purpose Statement for My Dissertation
 
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Dr. Guy E. White of The Dissertation Mentor® ( www.TheDissertationMentor.com ) discusses How to Write a a Purpose Statement for Your Dissertation, How to write a dissertation, and How to Choose a Methodology. This video training focuses on how to write a dissertation. More specifically: How do I write a purpose statement? How do I write a dissertation well? How do I write my dissertation fast? How do I write a great dissertation? How do I choose a dissertation methodology? This Dissertation writing training workshop provides you the guidance you need to write your literature review and to know how to write chapter 3 of your dissertation. It also talks about how to start a dissertation.
Views: 27112 Guy E White
Discourse Communities
 
04:51
Recorded with http://screencast-o-matic.com
Views: 1371 Marlena Cardenas
Michael Taussig. When the Sun Goes Down. 2010
 
01:04:26
http://www.egs.edu/ Michael Taussig talking about Night Cries Tracy Moffatt poetry fiction Nietzsche mood weather pre-Copernican heliocentrism dialectical image state of emergency sleep awakening Walter Benjamin Arcades story Proust mythology sun worship twilight sunset Bernhard Cohen climate change global warming diurnal modernity Plato Bataille alchemy of the emotions ritual Conrad Goethe. Public open lecture for the students and faculty of the European Graduate School EGS Media and Communication Studies department program Saas-Fee Switzerland Europe 2010 Michael Taussig. Michael Taussig performs a literary lecture on a pre-Copernican way of seeing the world, taking in mind such thinkers as Nietzsche, Plato, Bataille, Proust, Benjamin, and others. Taussig examines light in crepuscular time and the relationship between nature and the body. Comparing the experience of the world between tribal time and modernity, Taussig brings us a poetic perspective that can only be found in recluse from technology. He shows a pastoral image of the world/community/body set aside the modern industrial city, all set around the icon of the sun. Michael Taussig, Ph.D., is an Australian-born anthropologist known for his provocative ethnographic studies and unconventional style as an academic. He studied medicine in Australia at the University of Sydney, and he earned a Ph.D. in anthropology at the London School of Economics. He is currently a professor of anthropology at Columbia University in New York. Strongly influenced by both the Frankfurt School of critical theory and French post-structuralism, Michael Taussig was part of the shift during the 1980s within the field of anthropology toward an increasing mistrust of cultural analyses from the perspective of the dominant culture, i.e. Western capitalist culture. It was his early experiences as a doctor in Colombia in the late 1960s that influenced a fundamental change in his conception of the role of stories and narratives, over and against objective scholarship, in cultural formation. Ethnography became a conscious positive force in culture, as no account was intrinsically innocent or objective any longer. This led Michael Taussig to begin intermixing fact and fiction in his ethnographic studies, thus his status as a figure of controversy in the field of anthropology. The style and message of Michael Taussig's work derive from the impressions formed from his early experiences with conflicting cultural narratives in the struggle between the guerrillas and the paramilitaries in Colombia. This came across in the early book The Devil and Commodity Fetishism in South America (1980), which is a radical reverse analysis of capitalist culture through the viewpoint of the culture of indigenous people in Colombia and Bolivia. Through the analysis of the magical beliefs of indigenous peasants about striking a deal with the devil and baptizing money, he finds in these stories not the cultural sediment of a pre-capitalist belief system, but rather an explanation of the workings of capitalism from the perspective of the exploited class. Michael Taussig's second book, Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man (1987), went further in the application of the ethnographic case study model which he was fashioning. In this work, Michael Taussig attempts an exploration of the 'epistemic murk' and 'the fiction of the real' in the interrelation between colonialist terror and shamanistic healing in Colombia from the nineteenth through the twentieth century. Michael Taussig finds in these two cultural forces neither an opposition nor a dialectical synthesis, but a kind of reflective co-creation within the 'space of death' of colonialist terror, opening up forces of order and chaos which did not exist hitherto in these regions (Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man).
Day 1b Writing workshop for Natural and Social Scientists with Helen Verran
 
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Knowledge, Governance, and Organization Management through Objects: Writing workshop expanding our capacity to attend to objects of governance for Natural and Social Scientists The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Casuarina Campus, Red Room, 28 -- 30 August 2013* To be led by Adjunct Professor Helen Verran http://www.cdu.edu.au/the-northern-institute/helen-verran The contention at the core of this workshop is that promoting ground-up approaches to policy where the knowledge work of devising an evidence base is not separate from policy work, requires expansions of our view -- away from both a narrow natural focus, and a partial social focus. We propose that a way to begin that work is offered by undertaking either reflective or ethnographic writing. Nurturing our capacities for careful narrative writing is increasingly being recognised as crucial in generative ground-up policy engagement. This workshop is set to run for four months with an intensive during the last week of August which will offer opportunity for reading and talking. In addition the workshop will offer support for personal writing development before, during, and after the intensive. The inspiration for our workshop is a short excerpt from Michel Serres Angels. A Modern Myth (1995). Paris: Flammarion. The chapter entitled "Message Systems" is a conversation between Pia and Pantope who, as modern workers do, have met up in an airport. A discussion about their work leads from one thing to another...Pantope asserts... "Science says there is a distinction between the subject which is thinking and active, and the object with is passive and thought of." Pia responds... "That displays total ignorance of the act of knowing! Objects know in a different way to us that's all." "That's untenable." Pia points towards the window. "Look at those children out there playing ball. The clumsy ones are playing with the ball as if it were an object, while the more skillful ones handle it as if it were playing with them: they move and change position according to how the ball moves and bounces. As we see it the ball is being manipulated by human subjects; this is a mistake—the ball is creating the relationships between [the children]. It is in following its trajectory that their team is created, knows itself and represents itself. Yes the ball is active. It is the ball that is playing. We would like workshop participants to identify an entity involved in knowing, management, and/or governance that they are already familiar with, or would undertake to become familiar with, and to commit to writing in some narrative genre about that entity. Your first step is to register your interest in participating in this writing exercise, and start thinking about the 'balls' with which you work and which produce your team -- and maybe your spectators. We will come back to you with some more formal instructions and readings. At this stage you do not need to worry about whether you can attend the workshop or not. It would be good if you can attend and there may be funds available to pay for some flights and accommodation. We expect to spend a couple of hours each day for three days with Helen, and then spend time alone or in groups discussing and developing our texts. Helen will also be giving a public seminar while she is here. Very relevant to our workshop, it will be on "Anthropology's Ontological Turn and Objects of Governance as Matters of Concern". The expectation is that at the end of the workshop we will put together for submission to a refereed publication a collection of texts that are developed during the workshop. Publication could be in Learning Communities Journal. (http://www.cdu.edu.au/centres/spill//publications_ijlsc.html?q=centres/spil/ publications_ijlsc.html ).
Michael Taussig. Narrative and Customs. 2010
 
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http://www.egs.edu/ Michael Taussig, philosopher, talking about the devil, storytelling, customs and catastrophe. In the lecture Michael Taussig discusses the concepts of Benjamin, subcultures, repression and freedom focusing on lust, shock, anthropology, mystery, fieldwork, EGS, European Graduate School. Public open lecture for the students and faculty of the European Graduate School EGS Media and Communication Studies department program Saas-Fee Switzerland Europe 2010 Michael Taussig. This lecture deals with narratives and customs in relation to the overall project of Fictocriticism which can be described as a reaction to theory, or a kind of anti-theory. In this seminar, Taussig discusses social anthropology and fieldwork, notebooking and diary writing, as a way of being in and seeing the world. Fictocriticism blends fact and fiction, ethnographic observation, and cultural history. Taussig's work draws strongly from Benjamin and Adorno. Fictocriticism can be described as a reaction to theory, or a kind of anti-theory. In this seminar, Taussig discusses social anthropology and fieldwork, notebooking and diary writing, as a way of being in and seeing the world. Fictocriticism blends fact and fiction, ethnographic observation, and cultural history. Taussig's work draws strongly from Benjamin and Adorno. Michael Taussig, Ph.D., is an Australian-born anthropologist known for his provocative ethnographic studies and unconventional style as an academic. He studied medicine in Australia at the University of Sydney, and he earned a Ph.D. in anthropology at the London School of Economics. He is currently a professor of anthropology at Columbia University in New York. Strongly influenced by both the Frankfurt School of critical theory and French post-structuralism, Michael Taussig was part of the shift during the 1980s within the field of anthropology toward an increasing mistrust of cultural analyses from the perspective of the dominant culture, i.e. Western capitalist culture. It was his early experiences as a doctor in Colombia in the late 1960s that influenced a fundamental change in his conception of the role of stories and narratives, over and against objective scholarship, in cultural formation. Ethnography became a conscious positive force in culture, as no account was intrinsically innocent or objective any longer. This led Michael Taussig to begin intermixing fact and fiction in his ethnographic studies, thus his status as a figure of controversy in the field of anthropology. The style and message of Michael Taussig's work derive from the impressions formed from his early experiences with conflicting cultural narratives in the struggle between the guerrillas and the paramilitaries in Colombia. This came across in the early book The Devil and Commodity Fetishism in South America (1980), which is a radical reverse analysis of capitalist culture through the viewpoint of the culture of indigenous people in Colombia and Bolivia. Through the analysis of the magical beliefs of indigenous peasants about striking a deal with the devil and baptizing money, he finds in these stories not the cultural sediment of a pre-capitalist belief system, but rather an explanation of the workings of capitalism from the perspective of the exploited class. Michael Taussig's second book, Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man (1987), went further in the application of the ethnographic case study model which he was fashioning. In this work, Michael Taussig attempts an exploration of the 'epistemic murk' and 'the fiction of the real' in the interrelation between colonialist terror and shamanistic healing in Colombia from the nineteenth through the twentieth century. Michael Taussig finds in these two cultural forces neither an opposition nor a dialectical synthesis, but a kind of reflective co-creation within the 'space of death' of colonialist terror, opening up forces of order and chaos which did not exist hitherto in these regions (Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man). Michael Taussig is the author of The Devil and Commodity Fetishism in South America (1980), Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study in Terror and Healing (1987), The Nervous System (1992), Mimesis and Alterity: A Particular History of the Senses (1993), The Magic of the State (1997), Defacement: Public Secrecy and the Labor of the Negative (1999), Law in a Lawless Land: Diary of a Limpieza in Colombia (2003), My Cocaine Museum (2004), Walter Benjamin's Grave (2006), and What Color is the Sacred? (2009).
Michael Taussig. The Fetishization of Field Notes. 2010
 
01:20:26
http://www.egs.edu/ Michael Taussig, philosopher, talking about the crime scenes, drawing, conversation, storytelling, Derrida, magic. In the lecture Michael Taussig discusses the concepts of autobiography, metaphysics, song and hands focusing on, Corporeal, Dionysian, Nietzsche, dance, anthropology, mystery, fieldwork, fetish, EGS, European Graduate School. Public open lecture for the students and faculty of the European Graduate School EGS Media and Communication Studies department program Saas-Fee Switzerland Europe 2010 Michael Taussig. This lecture deals with the fetishizaiton of field notes in relation to the overall project of Fictocriticism which can be described as a reaction to theory, or a kind of anti-theory. In this seminar, Taussig discusses social anthropology and fieldwork, notebooking and diary writing, as a way of being in and seeing the world. Fictocriticism blends fact and fiction, ethnographic observation, and cultural history. Taussig's work draws strongly from Benjamin and Adorno. Fictocriticism can be described as a reaction to theory, or a kind of anti-theory. In this seminar, Taussig discusses social anthropology and fieldwork, notebooking and diary writing, as a way of being in and seeing the world. Fictocriticism blends fact and fiction, ethnographic observation, and cultural history. Taussig's work draws strongly from Benjamin and Adorno. Michael Taussig, Ph.D., is an Australian-born anthropologist known for his provocative ethnographic studies and unconventional style as an academic. He studied medicine in Australia at the University of Sydney, and he earned a Ph.D. in anthropology at the London School of Economics. He is currently a professor of anthropology at Columbia University in New York. Strongly influenced by both the Frankfurt School of critical theory and French post-structuralism, Michael Taussig was part of the shift during the 1980s within the field of anthropology toward an increasing mistrust of cultural analyses from the perspective of the dominant culture, i.e. Western capitalist culture. It was his early experiences as a doctor in Colombia in the late 1960s that influenced a fundamental change in his conception of the role of stories and narratives, over and against objective scholarship, in cultural formation. Ethnography became a conscious positive force in culture, as no account was intrinsically innocent or objective any longer. This led Michael Taussig to begin intermixing fact and fiction in his ethnographic studies, thus his status as a figure of controversy in the field of anthropology. The style and message of Michael Taussig's work derive from the impressions formed from his early experiences with conflicting cultural narratives in the struggle between the guerrillas and the paramilitaries in Colombia. This came across in the early book The Devil and Commodity Fetishism in South America (1980), which is a radical reverse analysis of capitalist culture through the viewpoint of the culture of indigenous people in Colombia and Bolivia. Through the analysis of the magical beliefs of indigenous peasants about striking a deal with the devil and baptizing money, he finds in these stories not the cultural sediment of a pre-capitalist belief system, but rather an explanation of the workings of capitalism from the perspective of the exploited class. Michael Taussig's second book, Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man (1987), went further in the application of the ethnographic case study model which he was fashioning. In this work, Michael Taussig attempts an exploration of the 'epistemic murk' and 'the fiction of the real' in the interrelation between colonialist terror and shamanistic healing in Colombia from the nineteenth through the twentieth century. Michael Taussig finds in these two cultural forces neither an opposition nor a dialectical synthesis, but a kind of reflective co-creation within the 'space of death' of colonialist terror, opening up forces of order and chaos which did not exist hitherto in these regions (Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man). Michael Taussig is the author of The Devil and Commodity Fetishism in South America (1980), Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study in Terror and Healing (1987), The Nervous System (1992), Mimesis and Alterity: A Particular History of the Senses (1993), The Magic of the State (1997), Defacement: Public Secrecy and the Labor of the Negative (1999), Law in a Lawless Land: Diary of a Limpieza in Colombia (2003), My Cocaine Museum (2004), Walter Benjamin's Grave (2006), and What Color is the Sacred? (2009).
Genre Analysis Practice
 
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This video breaks down the work of analyzing genres into two basic steps. I will also guide you through some activities that help you practice identifying generic conventions.
TVAD Talk: Writing Textiles, Fashion, and Design Reform in Austria-Hungary Before WW1
 
01:12:50
This study offers a new reading of fin-de-siècle culture in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy by looking at the unusual and widespread preoccupation with embroidery, fabrics, clothing, and fashion - both literally and metaphorically. Houze resurrects lesser known critics, practitioners, and curators from obscurity, while also discussing the textile interests of notable figures, Gottfried Semper and Alois Riegl. Spanning the 50-year life of the Dual Monarchy, this study uncovers new territory in the history of art history, insists on the crucial place of women within modernism, and broadens the cultural history of Habsburg Central Europe by revealing the complex relationships among art history, women, and Austria-Hungary. Houze surveys a wide range of materials, from craft and folk art to industrial design, and includes overlooked sources-from fashion magazines to World's Fair maps, from exhibition catalogues to museum lectures, from feminist journals to ethnographic collections. Restoring women to their place at the intersection of intellectual and artistic debates of the time, this book weaves together discourses of the academic, scientific, and commercial design communities with middle-class life as expressed through popular culture.