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SeaDAS Tutorial: CaseStudy (Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies)
 
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This video demonstrates a multitude of tools within SeaDAS through a case study which uses sea surface temperature measurements obtained from the MODIS Aqua satellite to produce images and analysis of El Nino and La Nina events. SeaDAS is NASA software for the analysis, processing, and visualization of ocean color satellite data. For more help and to download SeaDAS visit: http://seadas.gsfc.nasa.gov For a breakdown of this video's parts and links to specific part visit: http://seadas.gsfc.nasa.gov/tutorial Any questions about SeaDAS or this video may be posted on the Ocean Color forum at http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/ (link to it available on the SeaDAS website.)
Views: 11944 NASA OceanColor
Sea surface temperature anomaly timeline: 1982-2017
 
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El Niño is an irregularly recurring climate pattern characterized by warmer than usual ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific, which creates a ripple effect of anticipated weather changes in far-spread regions of Earth. This visualization captures sea surface temperature anomalies around the world from 1982 to 2017, along with a corresponding time plot graph that represents average equatorial sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean from about the International Date Line to the coast of South America. Highlighted in the timeline are the El Niño years in which sea surface temperature anomalies peaked: 1982-1983, 1997-1998, and 2015-2016. Download the video: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=4695&button=recent
Views: 1112 NASA Climate Change
1997 and 2015 El Niño Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies
 
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A brief comparison of changes in sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies between the major El Niño event of 1997-98 and the El Niño event emerging in 2015. The visualization depicts data from the NOAA 1/4° daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST). The data are combined from sources such as satellites, buoy networks, and ships. The OISST analyses are named for the key satellite sensor used: in this case, the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). More about OISST/AVHRR: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oisst More about El Niño and La Niña: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/backgrounders/el-nino-la-nina-enso Visualization and Postproduction Matt Rehme (NCAR/CISL) Special Thanks to Tim Scheitlin (NCAR/CISL) Data Obtained from: NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov Earth imagery is courtesy of the NASA Visible Earth Project Visualization Software: The NCAR Command Language (Version 6.3.0) [Software]. (2015). Boulder, Colorado: UCAR/NCAR/CISL/VETS. http://dx.doi.org/10.5065/D6WD3XH5 The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Copyright 2015 UCAR Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Views: 170848 NCAR VisLab
Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies 1981-2014
 
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Monthly averaged sea surface temperature anomalies (ºC) referenced to a 1981-2010 climatology. Anomalies exceeding 2ºC are contoured. Data sourced from NOAA AVHRR-only OISST version 2.
Views: 477 Hillary Scannell
Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly Data, 1980-1999
 
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Rather than plotting sea surface temperatures, sea surface temperature anomalies have been plotted here to show the dramatic departures from normal that are associated with El Nino and La Nina from 1980 - 1999. El Nino is the warming of the Pacific Ocean off of the western coast of South America near Ecuador and Peru. It is called El Nino, or little boy in Spanish, referring to the Christ child because the phenomena usually occurs near Christmas time. The opposite of El Nino is La Nina, or little girl in Spanish, which is a cooling of the Pacific Ocean. The red shading signifies a warming of the ocean by 5-10°F, the green shading is normal and the blue shading is a cooling of the ocean by 5-10°F. Play video of SST Anomaly visualization El Nino Sample from 3/30/97 through 6/10/98 In strong El Nino years, a prominent red band indicating warmer water extends out into the Pacific Ocean. Observed El Nino years include 1982-1983, 1986-1987, 1991-1992, 1993, 1994, and 1997-1998. The series of El Nino's in the early 1990's was unusual because they were spaced so close together, though they were all relatively weak. The most notable El Nino years include 1982-1983, 1986-1987 and 1997-1998. In fact, the 1997-1998 El Nino was so strong that it started to gain national attention. The effects of a strong El Nino include a wetter than normal season in most of the United States, though the Pacific Northwest states tend to be drier. An El Nino affects the weather worldwide. Indonesia and the Philippines, for example, are drier than normal during El Nino and have increased risk of forest fires while East Africa experiences much wetter conditions from March through May. La Nina has the opposite effect as El Nino, causing the United States to be drier than normal. Samples of a strong El Nino and La Nina occurrence are available as additional datasets. In these datasets, the land is true color shaded and a mask has been applied to highlight only the region off of South America.
Views: 4950 NOAA SOS
El Nino 2015: Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
 
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The record El Nino of 2015 produced heavy precipitation in the drought-stricken Western United States. An unprecedented number of tropical storms also formed as a result of the warm Pacific Ocean. The same conditions produced drier weather in the Atlantic and Africa.
Views: 255 Pangloss Tech
La Nina 2007 Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies
 
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Sea surface temperature anomalies for the 2007 La Nina NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio This visualization shows the 2007 La Nina event in the Pacific Ocean. Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies from 2007 are shown based on a 3-day moving average using Aqua/AMSR-E SST data.
Views: 587 CuriousVideos
ENSO Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies: 2015
 
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The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña). This animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies (relative to the respective normal state) in the Pacific Ocean associated with the 2015 El Niño, the warm phase ENSO. SST anomalies reflect the heat content in the mixed layer (upper 50 meters). Credit: NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Twitter: https://twitter.com/SciTechFliX Google +: https://plus.google.com/+SciTechFliXTube Subscribe to FeedBurner: https://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=TubeCloud
Views: 2204 SciTech .FliX
Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly (SSTA)
 
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Global sea surface temperature anomaly animation from NOAA OI.v2 SST monthly fields by Reynolds from january 1982 to december 2007.
Views: 487 Fabrício Oliveira
Sea surface Temperature anomalies for 2010-01-01  to 2016-09-22
 
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I've been a little bit obsessed with long term weather forecasting lately (trying to work out if it's going to be a good snowboarding season on not). So I scraped all of NASA's Sea surface temperature anomaly data for 2010 to today then made a movie from it. Everything pretty much catches fire in 2015
Views: 34 Greg Thomas
2015-2016 El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies (SSTA)
 
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The animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) associated with the 2015-16 El Niño in the Pacific Ocean. The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña).
Views: 1894 NASAJPLPODAAC
Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
 
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Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
Views: 9 Justin Freeman
Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
 
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Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
Views: 2 Justin Freeman
Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
 
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Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
Views: 4 Justin Freeman
Seamounts/vulcanism, upwelling and sea surface temperature anomalies
 
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Recorded on 9.19.2018 End chopped off. I was saying my mind wants to connect the sea surface temperature anomalies in a circular fashion in the southern hemisphere...with the seamounts, but cannot substantiate that at this time. I personally believe that the seamounts are important to monitor. They are not confined to "salt water" basins only. Extreme sea temperature variations in close proximity of one another, caught my attention. links on the way nullschool.net https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/ocean/primary/waves/overlay=sea_surface_temp_anomaly/orthographic=-14.24,-57.58,253/loc=27.979,62.483 seamounts/southwest and southeast indian ridge (search) https://www.google.com/search?biw=1067&bih=521&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=0GChW7zqIKvYjwTtzrXQDg&q=seamounts%2Fsouthwest+and+southeast+indian+ridge&oq=seamounts%2Fsouthwest+and+southeast+indian+ridge&gs_l=img.12...380971.393463..400162...1.0..0.147.1818.0j15......1....1..gws-wiz-img.xlTboQkRNOk#imgrc=_&spf=1537383387873 Earth Changing Extremities https://yamkin.com/category/earthquake/southwest-indian-ridge/ Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) https://alchetron.com/Southwest-Indian-Ridge#- Litvin Seamount: Undersea Features https://geographic.org/geographic_names/name.php?uni=10649958&fid=6443&c=undersea_features#UFI Finland Sea Temperature http://seatemperature.net/country/finland Ekenäs, Finland https://www.google.com/maps/place/Jyv%C3%A4skyl%C3%A4,+Finland/@61.5996661,25.7487359,6z/data=!4m13!1m7!3m6!1s0x468d0782b937418b:0x2600b5523c18d102!2sEken%C3%A4s,+Finland!3b1!8m2!3d59.9741851!4d23.4375724!3m4!1s0x46857415d1a93119:0xba57697d6790a2d7!8m2!3d62.24235!4d25.7478333?hl=en finnish lakeland water temperature (search) https://www.google.com/search?num=40&source=hp&ei=8eehW8nlDdiojwSJh5aABw&q=finnish+lakeland+water+temperature&oq=Finnish+Lakeland+water+t&gs_l=psy-ab.1.6.33i22i29i30l10.2234.13500..17891...0.0..0.165.1147.1j9......0....1j2..gws-wiz.....0..0j0i22i30j33i160j33i21.pLA40q05E8w Any gestures of good faith will help me...help others. Thank you in advance for your kind words, thoughts and support. Digiduit https://paypal.me/Digiduitcares
Views: 581 Digiduit
1996-2016 Sea Surface Temperature
 
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Global SST anomaly of 1996-2016 Source: http://www.ospo.noaa.gov/Products/ocean/sst/anomaly/index.html (NOAA) For less sciency en more nonsense visit: 50 Random Something: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh4n5uOGcU5_nt1IHDnBkxw
Average Weekly Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies During El Niño
 
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The animation shows the progression of sea surface temperatures anomalies (SSTas) during the 2015-16 El Niño event. Through a complex feedback, decreasing easterly winds along the equator during an El Nino create less upwelling of colder deeper ocean water and hence are associated with higher temperatures (red). The warmer temperatures affect the overlying air reducing the pressure of the air. This reenforces the the wind circulation changes and the temperature continues to increase. The change in the ocean temperatures impact convection (rain) in the tropics which in turn can impact the atmosphere away from the tropics towards mid-latitudes. (Credit: NOAA/ESRL Physical Sciences Division, http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/)
Views: 392 NOAAESRL
ElNiño Watch 2015 - Daily Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly (12/1/13 through 8/31/15)
 
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The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña). This animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies (relative to the respective normal state) in the Pacific Ocean associated with the developing 2015 El Niño, the warm phase ENSO. SST anomalies reflect the heat content in the mixed layer (upper 50 meters).
Views: 539 NASAJPLPODAAC
2015 Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies
 
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This video shows areas of anomalously warm (red colors) and cool (blue colors) sea surface temperatures across the Equatorial Pacific Ocean.
Views: 2228 NWSTampa
Sea-surface temperature anomalies 2018
 
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This shows sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies - that is the difference from the 1981-2010 average - for Jan 1 - Dec 31 2018. You can see (among many other things): The transition from La Nina through neutral conditions to El Nino (maybe). The marine heatwave in the Tasman Sea and around New Zealand early in the year. The intense warming of surface waters associated with the heatwaves over Europe and Japan during the spring and summer. The development of a "tripole" cold-warm-cold pattern in the North Atlantic. The return of the warm blob in the northeast Pacific. Higher-than-average SST in the Arctic where sea-ice extent has been below average. And much much more... Data are from the OSTIA data set Animation rendered and composited in IDL and Blender
Views: 86 BoggisMakesVideos
North Atlantic Ocean Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly Maps
 
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Sea surface temperature varies due to solar heating and air-sea exchange of heat, as well as due to transport of warm waters and mixing with cooler, deeper waters. The animation shows the annual anomalies in sea surface temperature (C) in the North Atlantic, varying from -1.5C (blue) to +1.5C (red). The animation is broadly similar to the ocean heat content change, regions of higher sea surface temperature generally coinciding with greater ocean heat content, although there are detailed differences, particularly in the subtropical latitudes. Again there is strong decadal variability for the ocean gyres, as well as a recent surface warming for 2000 to 2010. The sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies are generally viewed as being driven by anomalies in air-sea fluxes on interannual timescales (greater heat input from the atmosphere leads to warmer SST), but might feedback back and determine the air-sea fluxes on decadal or longer timescales (a warmer SST leads to a greater loss of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere). There is also a physical transport of the SST anomalies on all timescales.
Views: 322 OceanClimateAtUoL
ElNiño Watch 2015 - Daily Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly  (12/1/13 through 11/15/15)
 
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The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña). This animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies (relative to the respective normal state) in the Pacific Ocean associated with the developing 2015 El Niño, the warm phase ENSO. SST anomalies reflect the heat content in the mixed layer (upper 50 meters).
Views: 1346 NASAJPLPODAAC
Global 3D Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies
 
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3D spatial time-lapse animation of global sea surface temperature anomalies referenced to a 15-year moving climatology. This animation shows the growth and decay of positive anomalies from 1950 to 2008 by extracting isosurface data from a cube of gridded sea surface temperature data sourced from NOAA's ERSSTv3b product.
Views: 126 Hillary Scannell
Global temperature anomalies from 1880 to 2017
 
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Earth’s global surface temperatures in 2017 were the second warmest since modern record-keeping began in 1880, according to an analysis by NASA. Continuing the planet’s long-term warming trend, globally averaged temperatures in 2017 were 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (0.90 degrees Celsius) warmer than the 1951 to 1980 mean, according to scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York. That is second only to global temperatures in 2016. Last year was the third consecutive year in which temperatures were more than 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) above late nineteenth-century levels. NASA’s temperature analyses incorporate surface temperature measurements from 6,300 weather stations, ship- and buoy-based observations of sea surface temperatures, and temperature measurements from Antarctic research stations. These raw measurements are analyzed using an algorithm that considers the varied spacing of temperature stations around the globe and urban heating effects that could skew the conclusions. These calculations produce the global average temperature deviations from the baseline period of 1951 to 1980. The full 2017 surface temperature data set and the complete methodology used to make the temperature calculation are available at http://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/. GISS is a laboratory within the Earth Sciences Division of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The laboratory is affiliated with Columbia University’s Earth Institute and School of Engineering and Applied Science in New York. NASA uses the unique vantage point of space to better understand Earth as an interconnected system. The agency also uses airborne and ground-based monitoring, and develops new ways to observe and study Earth with long-term data records and computer analysis tools to better see how our planet is changing. NASA shares this knowledge with the global community and works with institutions in the United States and around the world that contribute to understanding and protecting our home planet.
Views: 192105 NASA Climate Change
Earth surface temperature anomalies for each month between 1880 and 2017
 
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Depicted is the deviation from the monthly temperature means (determined in the time frame 1951-1980) for each month between 01-1880 and 04-2017. The used temperatures are the "Combined Land-Surface Air and Sea-Surface Water Temperatures (Land-Ocean Temperature Index, LOTI)". The boxes in the top area track the maximum positive deviation to date for each month. The history of the temperature deviation is graphed below. Data source: NASA GISS Tools: Processing
Views: 225 PeterPain
El Niño and La Niña: Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies, 1997-1999
 
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Changes in sea surface temperature during the major El Niño event of 1997-98 and during a subsequent, La Niña period are depicted in this data visualization. The event helped El Niño become a household name, as reports of its impacts miles away - from record rainfall in California to a tornado in Florida and major drought in Indonesia - made the news. The visualization depicts data from the NOAA 1/4° daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST). The data are combined from sources such as satellites, buoy networks, and ships. The OISST analyses are named for the key satellite sensor used: in this case, the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). More about El Niño and La Niña: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/backgrounders/el-nino-la-nina-enso Visualization and Postproduction Matt Rehme (NCAR/CISL) Special Thanks to Tim Scheitlin (NCAR/CISL) Data Obtained from: NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov Earth imagery is courtesy of the NASA Visible Earth Project Visualization Software: The NCAR Command Language (Version 6.2.1) [Software]. (2014). Boulder, Colorado: UCAR/NCAR/CISL/VETS. http://dx.doi.org/10.5065/D6WD3XH5 The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Copyright 2014 UCAR Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Views: 2222 NCAR VisLab
Multidecadal Changes In Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies.wmv
 
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This video presents evidence that multidecadal variations in the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña events are responsible for the multidecadal changes in Global Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies.
Views: 297 BobTisdale1
Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
 
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http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/GlobalMaps/view.php?d1=AMSRE_SSTAn_M#
Views: 2437 Ekaterina Borovikova
1997-1998 El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies (SSTA)
 
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The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña). The 1997-98 event was the first major El Niño that was observed extensively by satellites, including those that measured SST and sea surface height (SSH). These measurements are helpful to examine the evolution of an El Niño event. The animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) associated with the1998-1998 El Niño in the Pacific Ocean. More information on this topic available at: http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/dataset/NCDC-L4LRblend-GLOB-AVHRR_OI To download the animation go to: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a030000/a030500/a030551/
Views: 4833 NASAJPLPODAAC
Sea-surface temperature anomalies - 1 Jan 2018 to 27 Nov 2018
 
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This shows sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies - that is the difference from the 1981-2010 average - for 2018 up to 27 November. You can see (among many other things): The transition from La Nina through neutral conditions to the possible early stages of a late-in-the-year El Nino. The marine heatwave in the Tasman Sea and around New Zealand early in the year. The intense warming of surface waters associated with the heatwaves over Europe and Japan during the spring and summer. The development of a "tripole" cold-warm-cold pattern in the North Atlantic. The return of the warm blob in the northeast Pacific. Higher-than-average SST in the Arctic where sea-ice extent has been below average. And much much more... Data are from the OSTIA data set Animation rendered and composited in IDL and Blender
Views: 35 BoggisMakesVideos
Sea surface temperature anomaly Jan 2014 - Aug 2015
 
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Sea surface temperature anomaly, compared to 1951_1980. For the period January 2014 to August 2015. NASA ERSSTv4 data with 1200km smoothing radius. Created by Sam Carana for Arctic-news.blogspot.com
Views: 502 Sam Carana
El Niño: Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Anomalies
 
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The animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSSH) anomalies* (relative to the respective normal state, i.e., seasonal climatology) associated with the 2009-10 El Nino in the Pacific Ocean. SST and SSH anomalies reflect the heat content in the mixed layer (approximately upper 50 m) and the upper ocean (approximately upper 150 m) respectively. They provide complimentary views of the oceanic signature of climate variability El Nino. In April 2009, initial warming appeared in the eastern equatorial Pacific and grew into a moderate warming event by the end of the year. The event decays somewhat during the first two months of 2010, but later strengthens so that it now ranks in the top ten of the strongest events observed to date. The latest data shows the surface warming extending farther westward across the dateline than was seen in most of the El Nino events in the past few decades. *Data: The SST data are obtained from a blended AMSR-E and MODIS product. The seasonal climatology of SST (derived from AVHRR Pathfinder SST for the period of 1982-2008) is subtracted from the AMSR-E and MODIS blended data to produce the anomaly. The SSH data are from the OSTM/JASON-2 satellite altimetry mission. The seasonal climatology of the SSH data is for the period of 1993-2008. Original file source: http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/content/ssta_ssha_animation_hires1.mp4 Please give credit for this item to: NASA/JPL Physical Oceanography DAAC
Views: 2590 NASAJPLPODAAC
Sea surface temperature anomalies in the northwest Atlantic
 
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Daily sea surface temperature anomalies relative to the 1981-2010 average. The images are the average over a sliding 15 day window. Red colors indicate warmer than average, blue is cold. Over the last 10 years, the Gulf of Maine has been warming faster than 99.85% of the global ocean (http://www.seascapemodeling.org/seascape_projects/2014/01/the-gulf-of-maine-is-warming-fast.html).
Views: 54 Andrew J. Pershing
SST anomalies 2001-2008 - north atlantic
 
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Video of the sea-surface-temperature anomalies reported by the NOAA on: http://www.osdpd.noaa.gov/PSB/EPS/SST/climo.html Sorry, no date information in the frames, it's a bluntly cropped version of the other one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4WfdGVwJ_o
Views: 1106 withnowatch
Sea surface height anomaly
 
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El Niño is characterized by unusually warm ocean temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific. The warmer water associated with El Niño displaces colder water in the upper layer of the ocean causing an increase in sea surface height because of thermal expansion. This visualization, created using a sea surface height anomaly product produced by AVISO, shows sea surface height anomalies (SSHA) from January 1, 2015 to January 22, 2016. The maps have been processed to highlight the interannual signal of SSH, i.e., the mean signal, seasonal signal, and the trend have been removed. Red and white shades indicate high sea surface heights relative to the reference state, while blue and purple shades indicate sea surface heights lower than the reference state. Neutral conditions appear green. After five consecutive months with sea surface temperatures 0.5 degrees Celsius above the long-term mean, NOAA issued an El Niño Advisory to declare the arrival of the phenomenon. A statement issued by the NOAA Climate Prediction Center on March 10, 2016, states that "A transition to ENSO-neutral is likely during late Northern Hemisphere spring or early summer 2016, with close to a 50 percent chance for La Niña conditions to develop by the fall.” More information: http://www.aviso.altimetry.fr/en/data/products/sea-surface-height-products/global.html
Views: 2223 NASA Climate Change
2009-2010 El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies (SSTA)
 
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The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña). The animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) associated with the 2009-10 El Niño in the Pacific Ocean. Another multimedia item related to this story: ENSO Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies: 1997-1998 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rPqIuXlWuA) More information on this topic available at: http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/dataset/NCDC-L4LRblend-GLOB-AVHRR_OI
Views: 745 NASAJPLPODAAC
La Nina 2007 Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies
 
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Sea surface temperature anomalies for the 2007 La Nina NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio This visualization shows the 2007 La Nina event in the Pacific Ocean. Changes in sea surface temperature during the major El Niño event of 1997-98 and during a subsequent, La Niña period are depicted in this data visualization. The event helped El Niño become. The animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH) anomalies (relative to the respective normal state, i.e., seasonal climatology) associated. Rather than plotting sea surface temperatures, sea surface temperature anomalies have been plotted here to show the dramatic departures from normal that are associated w
Views: 5 Hugh Roach
Sea Surface Temperatures 2017
 
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Satellites are a valuable tool for monitoring Earth’s oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of our planet. This visualization shows 2017 sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean using data from NOAA’s satellites.
Views: 692 NOAASatellites
Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly in 2016
 
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Timelapse showing sea surface temperature anomaly in 2016. Cyan is -3°C, blue is -1°C, black is 0°C, red is 1°C, yellow is 3°C. Compiled using images from http://earth.nullschool.net Music is Cylinder Eight by Chris Zabriskie
Views: 11 Alex Strinka
Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
 
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Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly
Views: 2 Justin Freeman
NOAA SST Anomalies
 
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Made by Bob Weber from SST plots here http://www.ospo.noaa.gov/Products/ocean/sst/anomaly/index.html
Animation of Weekly Global SST Anomaly Maps - November 1 1981 to January 6 2010
 
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The video uses weekly Global sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly maps downloaded from the NOAA NOMADS webpage and portrays the rise in SST anomalies since the start of the dataset, November 1, 1981.
Views: 3033 BobTisdale1
El Niño: GMAO Daily Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly from 1997/1998 and 2015/2016
 
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This visualization shows how the sea surface temperature anomaly data and subsurface temperature anomaly from the 1997 El Niño year compares to the 2015 El Niño year. Every two to seven years, an unusually warm pool of water -- sometimes two to three degrees Celsius higher than normal -- develops across the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean to create a natural short-term climate change event. This warm condition, known as El Niño, affects the local aquatic environment, but also spurs extreme weather patterns around the world, from flooding in California to droughts in Australia. In 2015 El Niño unfolded in the Pacific Ocean with sea surface temperatures showing different patterns than seen in the 1997-1998 El Niño. NASA scientists use computer models and other tools to study this large El Niño event, and compare it to other events in the past. 'The start of an El Niño is important,' said Robin Kovach, a research scientist with the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The visualization shows how the 1997 event started from colder-than-average sea surface temperatures, but the 2015 event started with warmer-than-average temperatures not only in the Pacific but also in in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. 'The '97 El Niño was much stronger in the Eastern Pacific, with much warmer water up to the coast of South America,' Kovach said. In 2015, the warmest waters are instead in the Central Pacific and extend west of the International Date Line. The water temperature variations typical of El Niño are not only at the surface of the equatorial Pacific, but below the surface as well. And these variations were also different in 2015, compared to 1997. At the height of the El Niño in November, colder-than-average temperatures in the Western Pacific and warmer-than-average temperatures in the Eastern Pacific were stronger and extended deeper in 1997 than in 2015. Goddard's computer models, with input from ocean buoys, atmospheric models, satellite data and other sources, can also simulate what ocean water temperatures could do in the coming months. The GMAO seasonal forecast, which takes 18 hours to complete, and creates more than 9 terabytes of data, shows that this 2015 El Niño could be different until the end. 'In the past, very strong El Niño events typically transition to neutral conditions and then a La Niña event,' said Kovach. February computer model runs forecast a return to normal sea surface temperatures by June. The latest Feb 5, 2016 forecast does not yet predict below normal sea surface temperatures that would result in a large La Niña. As of Feb. 14, 2016, the latest ocean computer model shows colder-than-average water temperatures off the South American coast from Ecuador to Panama. 'This current El Niño has been different so it will be interesting to see what happens in the next forecast and the coming months.' For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4433#30214.
Multidecadal Changes In SST Anomalies (Blog Version)
 
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This video presents evidence that multidecadal variations in the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña events are responsible for the multidecadal changes in Global Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies.
Views: 387 BobTisdale1
Global SST Anomaly Animation 1996 to 2009
 
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This video illustrates [OI.v2] Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Anomaly data for the Global Oceans from January 1996 through July 1, 2009.The contour level of the maps were set at 0.2 deg C to bring out the lower-intensity SST anomalies.
Views: 5361 BobTisdale1

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